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I have a list, root, of lists, root[child0], root[child1], etc.

I want to sort the children of the root list by the first value in the child list, root[child0][0], which is an int.

Example:

import random
children = 10
root = [[random.randint(0, children), "some value"] for child in range(children)]

I want to sort root from greatest to least by the first element of each of it's children.

I've taken a look at some previous entries that used sorted() and a lamda function I'm entirely unfamiliar with, so I'm unsure of how to apply that to my problem.

Appreciate any direction that can by given

Thanks

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Do you not get a TypeError: int is not iterable? –  Rushy Panchal Jul 3 '13 at 16:48
    
my mistake, fixed the code above. children now iterable through range() –  goatman Jul 3 '13 at 17:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You may specify a key function which will determine the sorting order.

sorted(root, key=lambda x: x[0], reverse=True)

You said you aren't familiar with lambdas. Well, first off, you can read this. Then, I'll give you the skinny: the lambda is an anonymous function (unless you assign it to a variable, a la f = lambda x: x[0]) which takes the form lambda arguments: expression. The expression is what is returned by the lambda. So the key function here takes one argument, x, and returns x[0].

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Thanks for the detailed response and the links, works perfectly –  goatman Jul 3 '13 at 22:08
    
@thismachinechills Glad it helped - check out Ashwini's answer for the itemgetter which will increase your performance. –  2rs2ts Jul 3 '13 at 22:09

You can the key parameter to specify the function or item you want to use for comparing the items.

key = lambda x : x[0]

or better : key = operator.itemgetter(0)

or you can also define your own function if necessary and pass it to key.

>>> root = [[random.randint(0, children), "some value"] for child in range(children)]
>>> root
[[3, 'some value'], [8, 'some value'], [5, 'some value'], [4, 'some value'], [3, 'some value'], [3, 'some value'], [2, 'some value'], [5, 'some value'], [5, 'some value'], [4, 'some value']]
>>> root.sort(key = lambda x : x[0], reverse = True)
>>> root
[[8, 'some value'], [5, 'some value'], [5, 'some value'], [5, 'some value'], [4, 'some value'], [4, 'some value'], [3, 'some value'], [3, 'some value'], [3, 'some value'], [2, 'some value']]

or using operator.itemgetter:

>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> root.sort(key = itemgetter(0), reverse = True)
>>> root
[[8, 'some value'], [5, 'some value'], [5, 'some value'], [5, 'some value'], [4, 'some value'], [4, 'some value'], [3, 'some value'], [3, 'some value'], [3, 'some value'], [2, 'some value']]
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Does itemgetter offer a performance boost? –  2rs2ts Jul 3 '13 at 16:52
    
@2rs2ts yes, just tested for 10**5 items: lambda : 1.01 sec, itemgetter: 750 ms. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 3 '13 at 16:54
1  
Nice, a big +1 to you! –  2rs2ts Jul 3 '13 at 16:55

That's the reverse of how Python sorts by default, so the key argument is unnecessary in this case - you can just use the reverse argument in isolation...

>>> import random
>>> import pprint
>>> root = [[random.randint(0, children), "some value"] for child in range(children)]
>>> pprint.pprint(root)
[[0, 'some value'],
 [2, 'some value'],
 [3, 'some value'],
 [1, 'some value'],
 [1, 'some value'],
 [1, 'some value'],
 [3, 'some value'],
 [7, 'some value'],
 [7, 'some value'],
 [8, 'some value']]
>>> root.sort(reverse=True)
>>> pprint.pprint(root)
[[8, 'some value'],
 [7, 'some value'],
 [7, 'some value'],
 [3, 'some value'],
 [3, 'some value'],
 [2, 'some value'],
 [1, 'some value'],
 [1, 'some value'],
 [1, 'some value'],
 [0, 'some value']]
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