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I have implemented a Convex hull algorithm in C++ using openMP.

The code can be found here: http://codepad.org/VVQdSdfM

Below are the results when tested in my Mac Book Pro:
      Processor Name:   Intel Core i5
      Processor Speed:  2.5 GHz
      Number of Processors: 1
      Total Number of Cores:    2
      L2 Cache (per Core):  256 KB
      L3 Cache: 3 MB
      Memory:   4 GB

Times the processor takes to run the code:

With two Threads:
(here size represents the number of points in the input and time in Seconds)

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:10=8.29697e-06
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:10=5.0807e-05

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:100=5.18084e-05
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:100=8.13007e-05

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:1000=0.000471377
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:1000=0.000283003

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:10000=0.00483506
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:10000=0.0032198

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:100000=0.0471328
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:100000=0.0333489

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:1000000=0.460131
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:1000000=0.267305


With four threads:

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:10=1.00136e-05
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:10=0.000106597

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:100=5.91993e-05
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:100=0.000114727

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:1000=0.000503755
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:1000=0.000302839

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:10000=0.00478158
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:10000=0.00235724

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:100000=0.0465738
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:100000=0.0223478

Average Sequential Time Elapsed in seconds for size:1000000=0.466074
Average Parallel Time Elapsed in seconds for size:1000000=0.221905

I find four slots in my activity monitor for CPU and i came to know that this version of intel processor supports Hyper-threading.

If that is the case, shouldn't I get a speed up of 4 when 4 threads are used?

Please provide me any pointers that can help me use the Hyper-Threading feature in Intel processors.

Thanks, Vijay

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2  
I think an important question here is "Is the convex hull algorithm suitable for parallelisation with linear speed up?" (I don't know the answer; just wondering) Also, I didn't find a mention of which is the algorithm in question (it seems there are several convex hull algorithms). And there is no code either, so how can we know whatever we suggest is an improvement to what you have if we don't know what you have? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 3 '13 at 17:04
    
Yes, The algorithm takes linear time. The algorithm runs on a sorted list of points. –  user2491531 Jul 3 '13 at 17:06
    
I don't know anything about the algorithm in question, but I have seen algorithms run significantly faster on lesser hardware due to the program and hardware "matching" each other better. For example, if a computer has an inferior processor but has fewer cache misses due to memory layout, it will fun faster. Just something to think about. –  Jake Sellers Jul 3 '13 at 17:10
1  
I have run the same code on a 4 core machine and observed a speed up of 3.7 on Linux operating System –  user2491531 Jul 3 '13 at 17:12
2  
Since the code runs 3.7 X faster on a 4 core processors, that eliminates the possibility that the algorithm does not scale above 2 cores. Hyperthreading does not equate extra cores. –  Tarik Jul 3 '13 at 17:20

1 Answer 1

When using hyperthreading in a HPC (high performance computing) context, you should not expect much improvement in performance. In fact you are better off switching hyperthreading off at the BIOS level. Hyperthreading gives the impression of extra cores, may improve performance in case many processes are running on the same CPU but does not add value for CPU intensive MPI applications.

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+1, hyperthreading can either improve or reduce the performance of your application, depending on the workload that you have (in our systems, after measuring we found out that hyperthreading was actually hurting our performance) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 3 '13 at 17:27
    
My understanding: Hyper Threading makes an Operating System think that it has more cores(logical) than physical cores. And in fact, OS a has a hardware support(replicated functional units) and here in this case, I do see a performance benefit by running the code using 4 threads. Why would it hinder the performance? –  user2491531 Jul 3 '13 at 17:30
1  
@user2491531 Because hyperthreads may be trying to use the same hardware on the chip, and if so then they have to wait for each other. (Similar to multiple OS threads on a single core machine.) Hyperthreads can have a benefit if the threads on a core are using different execution resources; e.g. one thread is doing integer arithmetic and another is doing SIMD. In this case the hyper threads aren't contending as much for the same execution resources and more hardware is put to work in parallel. –  bames53 Jul 3 '13 at 17:43
    
@bames53 I thought that the functional units are replicated on each of the cores in Hyper Threading so that two threads can simultaneously work with out the need for other to wait. –  user2491531 Jul 3 '13 at 17:44
    
@user2491531, Imagine a worker on a conveyor. If to make the worker to handle two conveyors, it does not mean the worker will have a 2x performance gain. The performance even can be worse, because he has to spend time to switch between the conveyors. The hyper-threading works in similar way - there are two workers (cores) and four conveyors (threads) and hyper-threading makes us think that there are 4 workers which handle conveyors. –  megabyte1024 Jul 3 '13 at 17:44

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