Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was testing a class in Linqpad and constructed a basic class but cannot get my head around how the two classes differ in execution. Can someone please help me out?

public class name // 1
{
    public string name1 {get;set;}
    public surname surname = new surname();
}

public class name // 2
{
    public string name1 {get;set;}
    public surname surname {get;set;}
    public name()
    {
    surname = new surname();
    }
}
public class surname
{
    public string surname1 {get;set;}
    public string surname2 {get;set;}
}
share|improve this question
    
... I'm pretty sure the line public surname = new surname(); is not even valid syntax in C#. –  feralin Jul 3 '13 at 17:30
    
Nevermind, you edited it. –  feralin Jul 3 '13 at 17:31
    
it was a fatfinger i edited it. –  Flood Gravemind Jul 3 '13 at 17:31
    
Ah, ok. No problem :) –  feralin Jul 3 '13 at 17:31
    
As a reference, you can look at stackoverflow.com/questions/24551/…. –  feralin Jul 3 '13 at 17:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

i rewrite your classes, clr define your code like this

public class name // 1
{
    private string _name1;
    public string get_name1()
    {
         return _name1;
    } 
    public void set_name1(string value)
    {
         this._name1=value;
    } 
    public surname surname = new surname();
}

public class name // 2
{        
    private string _name1;
    public string get_name1()
    {
         return _name1;
    } 
    public void set_name1(string value)
    {
         this._name1=value;
    } 
    private surname _surname = new surname();
    public surname get_surname()
    {
         return _surname;
    } 
    public void set_surname(surname value)
    {
         this._surname=value;
    } 
}
share|improve this answer

The former compiles to the same as:

public class name
{
    public string name1 {get;set;}
    public surname surname;
    public name()
    {
        surname = new surname();
    }
}

So the only difference is that in 1 you have a field, and in 2 you have a property. Since it is public, you should use a property. See Why use simple properties instead of fields in C#? for reasons why.

As an aside, a C# naming convention is that all properties, classes, and methods are PascalCase, not camelCase, so all of the things in your examples (with possible exception of the surname field) should begin with a capital letter.

share|improve this answer

One is a field. The other is a property. The surname property in name2 is translated by the compiler into getter and setter method pairs.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.