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this is below is code which i am using for simple task add , view is not getting render, i am not able to find the mistake ,

 <!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>

    <title>Calculator</title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="styles/bootstrap/css/bootstrap.min.css">
     <script src="js/libs/jquery-1.9.1.min.js"></script>
    <script src="js/libs/underscore-min.js"></script>
    <script src="js/libs/backbone-min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/template" id="display-template">
        <div class="row">
            <div class="span4">
                <%=content%>
            </div>
        </div>
    </script>
<script language="javascript">
var cdate;
var tasks={};

var app = app || {};

// App view responsible for rendering app
app.TaskView = Backbone.View.extend({

    el: $('#tasks'),

    template: _.template($('#display-template').html()),

    initialize: function () {
        this.render();
    },

    render: function () {
        console.log("render called");
        console.log(this.template());
        this.$el.html(this.template());
    }
});
app.task = Backbone.Model.extend({

    defaults:{
        content:null
    }
});
app.bUsers = Backbone.Collection.extend({ 
    model : app.task,
    initialize: function(models, args) {
       this.bind('add', this.renderone);
       this.bind('remove', this.destroy); },
    renderone:function(user){
        console.log(user);
        var view = new app.TaskView({model: user});
    },
   destroy:function(user){
        $(user.view.el).remove();
    }
});

app.Users = new app.bUsers();

$(document).ready(function() {



    cdate=new Date();
    $("#cdate").html(new Date());
    $("#pre").click(function(){
        cdate=new Date(cdate.getTime()-(1*24*3600*1000));
        $("#cdate").html(cdate);

    });
    $("#next").click(function(){
        cdate=new Date(cdate.getTime()+(1*24*3600*1000));
        $("#cdate").html(cdate);

    });
    $("#submit").click(function(){
        if(tasks[cdate]==undefined) tasks[cdate]=[];
        tasks[cdate].push($("#task").val());
        // app.appView = new app.TaskView({
            // model: new app.task({"content":$("#task").val()})
        // });
        var data ={"content":$("#task").val()}; 
        app.Users.add(data);


    });


});

</script>

</head>
<body>

<a id="pre" href="#">Prev</a>
<div id="cdate"></div>
<a id="next" href="#">Next</a>
<input type="text" id="task" ></input>
<input type="button" value="submit" id="submit" ></input>
<div id="tasks"></div>
</body>
share|improve this question
    
do you see any error in the console? –  Rayweb_on Jul 3 '13 at 18:11
    
which of logs do you see? –  Guy Korland Jul 3 '13 at 20:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Oye, you've got a few problems.

To answer your specific question, your render method of your view should take your view's model instance and get something from this.model.toJSON() it to get at its data to pass to the template method (toJSON really returns "JSONable" objects).

But that's not all.

Besides a few html issues, you also have stylistic problems.

Collections generally should not be concerned with views, only data (*). Views should be concerned with with collections and models. Collections communicate to views via event binding, which I see you are doing. However, for reuse purposes, you may have more than one combination views that might want to listen to events in the collection. By setting up the event binding in the collection, you've effectively limited your collection for only one use.

Views can do alot. There's not much reason to manually add DOM event handlers when you can code the view to do it for you.

I haven't written Backbone in a little while (not by choice!), but generally found it was a good idea to have a view dedicated to the collection, and then have a separate model view that the collection view might create or destroy based upon whatever events took place.

Here's a bit of a cleanup of your code to give you a starting example:

http://jsfiddle.net/jfcox/SmPNv/

HTML:

<a id="pre" href="#">Prev</a>

<div id="cdate">&nbsp;</div>
<a id="next" href="#">Next</a>

<input type="text" id="task" />
<input type="button" value="add" id="submit" />
<div id="tasks"></div>

Backbone definitions:

var defs = defs || {};
//first define the data handlers
defs.Task = Backbone.Model.extend({
    defaults: function () {
        return {
            content: null,
            addDate: (new Date()).toString()
        };
    }
});
defs.Users = Backbone.Collection.extend({
    model: defs.Task
});


// App view responsible for rendering app
defs.SingleTaskView = Backbone.View.extend({
    //since we can't control where the js is loaded, go ahead and make the template inline for jsFiddle demo.
    tagName: 'div',
    template: _.template('<div class="row">  <div class="span4"><%=content%></div> <em><%=addDate%></em> <button class="remove"> remove</remove> </div>'),
    events: {
        "click button.remove": "remove"
    },
    initialize: function (opts) {
        this.model.on('change', this.render, this);
    },
    render: function () {
        console.log("render called");
        var modelBare = this.model.toJSON();
        return this.$el.html(this.template(modelBare));
    },
    remove: function () {
        //removes from local collection, does not delete on server
        //for that, you'd want `this.model.destroy`
        this.collection.remove(this.model);
        //removes this view's element.
        this.$el.remove();
    }
})

defs.TasksView = Backbone.View.extend({

    el: 'body',
    events: {
        "click #pre": "doPrevious",
            "click #next ": "doNext",
            "click #submit ": "doSubmit"
    },
    cdate: null,
    initialize: function (opts) {
        this.cdate = new Date();
        this.render();
        this.collection.on('add', this.renderone, this);
    },
    render: function () {
        $("#cdate").html(this.cdate.toString());
    },
    doPrevious: function () {
        this.cdate = new Date(this.cdate.getTime() - (1 * 24 * 3600 * 1000));
        $("#cdate").html(this.cdate.toString());

    },
    doNext: function () {
        this.cdate = new Date(this.cdate.getTime() + (1 * 24 * 3600 * 1000));
        $("#cdate").html(this.cdate.toString());
    },
    doSubmit: function () {
        var data = {
            "content": $("#task").val()
        };
        this.collection.add([data]);
    },
    renderone: function (userModel) {
        var view = new defs.SingleTaskView({
            model: userModel,
            collection: this.collection
        });
        this.$el.find('#tasks').append(view.render());
    }
});

The application, itself.

var app = app || {};

app.users = new defs.Users();
(function ($) {
    $(document).ready(function () {
        app.usersview = new defs.TasksView({
            collection: app.users
        });

    });
})(jQuery);

(*) This is a guideline, not an absolute rule, of course. If you think a collection might work as some sort of workflow manager, etc, that might be fine, but that's an advanced topic.

Edit: I included the template inline, partially for reasons that I don't trust jsFiddle with inline "text" scripts. I'm not recommending any way to handle that, just that's how I did it here.

share|improve this answer
1  
You should not use toJSON() manually. A better, more idiomatic way of getting the same results is to use the attributes property of a model. this.template( model.attributes ) –  mor Jul 4 '13 at 0:22
    
When I was learning Backbone.js, many tutorials used toJSON, and some sources even recommended against using the internal attributes hash. I could see cases where it might be useful to call toJSON, although it might only be in cases where you just want to pass a whole bunch of data from a Collection to some alternate templating solution, instead of doing the view-per-model thing like I did above. But otherwise, sure, using toJSON might result in a bunch of needless copies and more for the garbage collector to go through when those copies are done being used. –  JayC Jul 4 '13 at 2:12

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