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I am using MVP to structure a project in C#. I previously had a IModel interface which contained CRUD operations, but have since split it into a number of Model interfaces (e.g. INotebookModel, ICategoryModel, IItemModel etc.) which each contain CRUD operations.

Would it be better to have an overall model which has CRUD methods that delegate to the appropriate specific models (e.g. create(String type)) or just holds references to each specific model in the presenter?

If having multiple models is a bad way to do it, how can I pass down the appropriate parameters so the model objects can be created/updated? As each object requires different information.

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1 Answer 1

Having different models is not a bad way to do it.

This will surely make your design more complex but certainly increase your app's maintainability. If you're building an app that needs to be evolutionary in future upgrades, then seperate your Model into several Models. This will help you in case you want to add a different entity into your app.

Maybe your books will be assigned to persons, then you will add a IPersonModel interface and the three other interfaces (INotebookModel, ICategoryModel, IItemModel) will remain intact.

However, if your application is simple and you want to favour rapid developement just centralize your model into one big Model. But be careful, if your app gets bigger, this model gets more and more complex since it will handle nearly all the app's responsabilities and you will have to explode it into many several ones.

So seperate your responsabilities, it is one of the SOLIDs. You can go further and take a look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOLID_(object-oriented_design)

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