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I've just started using Guice and having trouble with understanding the guice way of injection. I'm very familiar with Spring, but this seems a bit different.

I have a DAO class:

public class SomeDAO {
    @NotNull
    private DB db = null;

    public SomeDAO (String databaseName) throws Exception{
        xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
    }
}

I have a controller, say:

public class SomeController {
    private SomeDAO someDAO;
}

How should i use guice here to inject someDAO object? Note that the databaseName in SomeDAO constructor should be provided from SomeController.

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Ideally SomeController shouldn't have to know the name of the database. This would come from a configuration file or from your application context and you'd inject your DAO like this:

public class SomeController {
  private final SomeDAO someDAO;

  @Inject 
  SomeController(SomeDAO someDAO) {
    this.someDAO = someDAO;
  }
}

And then to inject the database name you could do something like this:

public class SomeDAO {

  @NotNull
  private DB db = null;

  @Inject
  public SomeDAO (@IndicatesDatabaseName String databaseName) throws Exception {
    ...
  }
} 

In this case Guice will provide databaseName (see https://code.google.com/p/google-guice/wiki/BindingAnnotations). If you want to give the controller knowledge of the database name then you could consider just newing the DAO from the controller (but still injecting the controller) or using assisted inject.

EDIT:

If the controller really needs to know about the database you could use assisted inject:

public class SomeController {

  private final SomeDAO someDAO;

  @Inject
  SomeController(@Assisted String databaseName) {
    this.someDAO = new SomeDAO(databaseName);
  }
}
public interface ControllerFactory {
  public SomeController create(String databaseName);
}
public static class MyModule extends AbstractModule {
  @Override
  protected void configure() {
    install(new FactoryModuleBuilder()
    .implement(SomeController.class, SomeController.class)
    .build(ControllerFactory.class));
  }
}

And then inject ControllerFactory where SomeController is needed. You could apply the same assisted injection to SomeDAO if it ends up needing more injected dependencies, as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks... but there are several databases to connect, so that knowledge is with Controllers only... so the database name needs to be passed to the DAO layer... Do you mean that i just need to make new SomeDAO("database")? In that case, that is not a DI pattern right? Can you please show me how to do this in DI way with Guice? –  popcoder Jul 4 '13 at 7:18
1  
How is your DAO connecting to multiple DBs? Do they all have the same schema? Added an example of using assisted inject. It's not necessarily bad to use new in the DI world - it just depends on your specific situation. If only the controller will ever need to know about the DAO and the DAO doesn't have other dependencies then stick with new. If other clients are going to instantiate the controller then you'd want to use assisted inject for that as well. –  condit Jul 4 '13 at 17:09
    
I'm using MongoDB, not much worried about schema in this application. –  popcoder Jul 4 '13 at 17:14

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