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I'm having a hard time finding adequate documentation on the subject, but my question is this: what is the flow of the authentication in MVC4? I am using a custom provider (that I'm still in the midst of coding as i gain a better understanding of the framework). Let me elaborate my current understanding so that I can place my question in context:

As I understand it, when a user logs in, the Login(LoginViewModel model, string returnUrl) action is fired which runs WebSecurity.Login(model.Username, model.Password, persistCookie: false). This method, in turn, fires ValidateUser in my custom membership class. From here, I need to do my work to actually authenticate the user. What I am currently doing is hitting our auth service to receive access and refresh tokens and store them in a cookie.

So, how does it work after the user is Validated? How does the framework know that the user is still logged in or logged out, user timeout, etc? I feel like there is something that I need to be doing during the ValidateUser process to do something with the user principal.

If you could help me get a better understanding of this process, it would be appreciated.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you are overriding the ASP.Net Membership Provider.

Login(LoginViewModel model, string returnUrl) action is fired which runs WebSecurity.Login(model.Username, model.Password, persistCookie: false). This method, in turn, fires ValidateUser in my custom membership class. From here, I need to do my work to actually authenticate the user. What I am currently doing is hitting our auth service to receive access => Here is what happens

You do not need to create Cookie by yourself.

public override bool ValidateUser(string username, string password)
{
   // just return true or false based on your auth service.
   // No need to create an authentication cookie.
   // Membership provider will create it for you if return is true.
}

When an authenticated user requests a page, MembershipProvider calls GetUser method to get MembershipUser object and create an IPrincipal object.

public override MembershipUser GetUser(string username, bool userIsOnline)
{       
   // Your code need to return MembershipUser like this -
   // return new MembershipUser(...)
   // Again you do not need to create IPrincipal object by yourself. 
}

By overriding those two methods, user can login to your site. Again, you do not need to create authentication cookie and Principal object which are Membership Provider's job.

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I see, so the cookie is created automatically so the only thing I need to do is save off my token responses from the auth service. How does the membership provider know how long to maintain that cookie? Is that in the web config or something? –  Sinaesthetic Jul 3 '13 at 19:26
    
this bit? <authentication mode="Forms"> <forms loginUrl="~/Account/Login" timeout="2880" /> </authentication> –  Sinaesthetic Jul 3 '13 at 19:28
    
Yes, it is in <authentication> tag of web.config. Basically, you do not even need to know authtoken which is provider's job. Membership provider looks at the setting inside <membership> web.config, and works according to what you have configured. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff647070.aspx –  Win Jul 3 '13 at 19:31
    
awesome, thank you –  Sinaesthetic Jul 3 '13 at 19:39
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Forms authentication is based on the cookie issued upon succesfull authentication. The cookie is returned to the browser and then it is sent with every request, it is the responsibility of the browser. You can use an http debugger to actually see the cookie first issued by the server and then sent everytime you make a request, Fiddler will do but it could even be the HttpFox.

When a request comes to the server, the ASP.NET pipeline involves series of http modules which fire consecutive events of the pipeline.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb470252%28v=vs.100%29.aspx

One of such modules, the FormsAuthenticationModule, is responsible for inspecting the cookie and setting the request principal (HttpContext.Current.User) depending on the cookie. The cookie data is encrypted so that it cannot be forget client-side but the server decrypts it and finds out the name of the user and the timespan the cookie is valid for. Yet another module, the UrlAuthorizationModule is responsible for checking out whether or not the current principal is authorized to actually access the resource and if not, the request is redirected to the login page (I can be wrong but I remember that the url authorization module is called from within the forms authentication module).

This happens early in the pipeline, in the AuthenticateRequest and then AuthorizeRequest events. If the forms module is succesfull and the Context.User is set, the remaining part of the pipeline can just access it and read the information on the current user. Also, this happens during every single request: each time you make a request, your cookie is decrypted and the request principal is set for the lifetime of the request.

This also means that you could possibly replace the forms authentication module with any other module responsible for setting the request's principal. A viable alternative to the forms module is the built-in SessionAuthenticationModule which is based on the same set of principles but also overcomes few of shortcomings of the forms module.

http://netpl.blogspot.com/2012/09/forms-authentication-revisited.html

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When you speak of the cookie that is set upon successful authentication, again I am using a custom provider. Do I need to set that cookie? If so, do I set it by hand, or through something else like against a user principal...or...? –  Sinaesthetic Jul 3 '13 at 19:19
1  
WebSecurity.Login should issue the cookie by itself. –  Wiktor Zychla Jul 3 '13 at 19:24
    
Thank you so much. That did help a lot with my understanding. I think the answer below is what really made it click, though so I chose that. You did get my upvote however :) –  Sinaesthetic Jul 3 '13 at 19:40
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