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I am getting a very specific cleanup crash under a set of circumstances and I'm totally lost as to what's going on so I'll just describe the conditions/program and what it's doing.

I have a win32 program using Direct2D to draw a test string and test bitmap on a black screen. It all works. No crashes, no memory leaks at all. HOWEVER that's only if I exit the program via:

case WM_KEYDOWN:
    if (wParam == VK_ESCAPE)
        PostQuitMessage(0); // close program
    break;

Which in turn causes my message loop to end, calling my cleanup code:

Application app(hWnd);

// message loop
while(true)
{
    // Check to see if any messages are waiting in the queue
    while(PeekMessage(&msg, NULL, 0, 0, PM_REMOVE))
    {
        // Translate the message and dispatch it to WindowProc()
        TranslateMessage(&msg);
        DispatchMessage(&msg);
    }

    // If the message is WM_QUIT, exit the while loop
    if(msg.message == WM_QUIT)
        break;

    // runtime code
    app.Update();

    // continue...
    Sleep(FRAME_DELAY);
}

// cleanup code
app.Delete();

That works. What doesn't work is if I click the red 'X' on the window which invokes WM_QUIT which I am not handling (and shouldn't have a reason to). When this happens, my message loop still ends, my app calls Delete() as it should, but it specifically crashes on the release of a D2D object. Order doesn't matter, and it doesn't seem to be dependent on anything else existing or being released/not being released. My IWICImagingFactory* just cannot be released without crashing, even if I don't load my image...

D2D::~D2D()
{
// release all bitmaps
for (list<tSprite>::iterator iter = m_vSprites.begin();iter != m_vSprites.end();++iter)
{
    SafeRelease(&(iter->m_pImage));
}

SafeRelease(&m_pWICFactory);// <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<THIS LINE
SafeRelease(&m_pText);
SafeRelease(&m_pDWFactory);
SafeRelease(&m_pBrush);
SafeRelease(&m_pD2D);
SafeRelease(&m_pD2DFactory);
}

And finally I added some code which, by chance, fixes the crash but I want to know why and if it's the correct thing to do. I wrapped my app's life into a COM init/unit call:

   // init code
CoInitializeEx(0,COINIT_DISABLE_OLE1DDE);//<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
Application app(hWnd);

// message loop
while(true)
...
// cleanup code
app.Delete();
CoUninitialize();//<<<<<<<<<<<<<

To sum it up, even without the COM code, the program functions properly and exits properly unless I click the red 'X' in which case only the D2D WIC image factory fails to release.

Similar problem (only mine only has an issue when cleaned up via WM_CLOSE?): Calling Inherited IUnknown::Release() in a destructor

share|improve this question
    
It is not only the correct thing to do, it is the required thing to do. WIC requires COM to be initialized. The only puzzle is why the program ran at all without it. Let's not worry about that. –  Hans Passant Jul 3 '13 at 19:50

1 Answer 1

Clicking the "red X" doesn't generate a WM_QUIT, it generates WM_CLOSE. If your message loop isn't handling that message and passing it to DefWindowProc then your main window will be destroyed, which then generates WM_DESTROY.

This is the "normal" flow for window destruction - WM_CLOSE, WM_DESTROY, PostQuitMessage, message loop ends.

Instead, by posting WM_QUIT yourself you are breaking out of the message loop immediately, leaving your window and everything else intact.

There's nothing inherently wrong with this, as long as you have coded to handle it, but by allowing DefWindowProc to process a normal window destruction as well you are creating a situation where you don't know if your window exists or not when you come out of your message loop, and I suspect it's this second case that is causing your problems.

I would advise changing what happens when you press escape - post your window a WM_CLOSE message, then implement handling for both that message and WM_DESTROY so that you always exit your message loop in the same controlled manner.

Additionally, your message loop is structured incorrectly and currently will only see WM_QUIT if it happens to be the last message to be retrieved by the PeekMessage loop - if it's not, you'll miss it entirely. You probably want something like this:

bool fGotQuit = false;
while(PeekMessage(&msg, NULL, 0, 0, PM_REMOVE))
{
    // If the message is WM_QUIT, exit the while loop
    if (fGotQuit = (msg.message == WM_QUIT))
        break;
    // Translate the message and dispatch it to WindowProc()
    TranslateMessage(&msg);
    DispatchMessage(&msg);
}

// If the message is WM_QUIT, exit the while loop
if(fGotQuit)
    break;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. After following your advice, it appears this was an issue with my understanding of the windows messages (mainly I didn't understand the relationship/ordering of QUIT, CLOSE, and DESTROY) and not COM. It was exactly what you said, the CLOSE was causing a DestroyWindow() (by default) which caused the window to be destroyed before my D2D cleanup code. I fixed it by allowing a WM_CLOSE case fallthrough into the WM_DESTROY in the WndProc switch. Additional thanks for the note about the message loop error. –  sz sz Jul 3 '13 at 20:09
    
For further note, I alternatively fixed it by not handling WM_DESTROY, and instead putting my cleanup code in WM_CLOSE just before the DestroyWindow(). I feel this is more correct, as Microsoft's purpose of WM_CLOSE seems to be "hey, this window is about to be destroyed. Do you want to do anything beforehand?" whilst the cleanup after the message loop is goofy. –  sz sz Jul 3 '13 at 20:33
    
There's nothing inherently wrong in what you were doing. Windows can exist before a message loop begins so there's no reason they can't persist after it exits. You just need to make sure you are handling shutdown consistently no matter how it's initiated. Anyway glad it's working for you now! –  Jonathan Potter Jul 3 '13 at 20:35
    
On the COM side of things, I was curious as to why my D2D was working without me having ever init'd COM. But, in an effort to prevent win32 background drawing on startup, I finally got an HRESULT error stating COM was uninitialized when attempting to render with a window that was not yet shown for the first time. Still not entirely sure how D2D init's COM itself. –  sz sz Jul 3 '13 at 21:10

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