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A laptop user running an ATI Radeon HD 5800 Series just showed me a video of my 2D game running on his machine, and it would appear my glScissor code was not working as intended on it (despite it working on soo many other computers).

Whenever I want to restrict rendering to a certain rectangle on the screen, I call my SetClip function to either the particular rectangle, or Rectangle.Empty to reset the scissor.

public void SetClip(Rectangle theRect)
{
    if (theRect.IsEmpty)
        OpenGL.glDisable(OpenGL.EnableCapp.ScissorTest);
    else
    {
        if (!OpenGL.glIsEnabled(OpenGL.EnableCapp.ScissorTest))
            OpenGL.glEnable(OpenGL.EnableCapp.ScissorTest);

        OpenGL.glScissor(theRect.Left, myWindow.clientSizeHeight - theRect.Bottom,
           theRect.Width, theRect.Height);
        CheckError();
    }
}

Is this approach wrong? For instance, I have a feeling that glEnable / glDisable might require a glFlush or glFinish to guarantee it's executed in the order in which I call them.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd put my money on a driver bug. Your code looks fine.

The only thing I suggest changing this:

if (!OpenGL.glIsEnabled(OpenGL.EnableCapp.ScissorTest))
       OpenGL.glEnable(OpenGL.EnableCapp.ScissorTest);

into a mere

OpenGL.glEnable(OpenGL.EnableCapp.ScissorTest);

Changing glEnable state comes practically free, so doing that test is a microoptimization. In fact first testing with glIsEnabled probably costs as much, as the overhead causes by redundantly setting it. But it happens that some drivers may be buggy in what they report by glIsEnabled, so I'd remove that to cut another potential error source.

I have a feeling that glEnable / glDisable might require a glFlush or glFinish to guarantee it's executed in the order in which I call them.

No they don't. In fact glFlush and glFinish are not required for most programs. If you're using a double buffer you don't need them at all.

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I'm in contact with the user, he ran AMD Driver Autodetect and it told him he had the latest driver, and is running Windows 7. –  Mr. Smith Jul 3 '13 at 19:31
    
@Mr.Smith: Yes. So what? Even the latest drivers can have bugs. –  datenwolf Jul 3 '13 at 19:48
    
Well I'll be damned, the glIsEnabled was not just a performance concern, but the culprit also. Removing it fixed it, and I also found others who've done similar: Explicitly save GL_SCISSOR_TEST to workaround driver bugs –  Mr. Smith Jul 3 '13 at 21:45

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