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I can't find an example of encrypting a string with "SHA-512" in C. Can someone help me with some code or a link. Thank you in advance.

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closed as off-topic by Shafik Yaghmour, Kerrek SB, Lundin, sashoalm, Cairnarvon Jul 5 '13 at 8:30

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7  
SHA 512 is not an encryption algorithm. Rather it's used for hashing. Where are you stuck? What are you really trying to do? –  Mike Dinescu Jul 3 '13 at 19:19
    
See here on SO. –  kgdesouz Jul 3 '13 at 19:20

3 Answers 3

SHA-512 is not an encryption algorithm, it is a cryptographic hash, which is completely different.

One library you can use to perform SHA hashes is OpenSSL. Here's an example of computing the raw SHA-512 hash of some data with OpenSSL:

#include <openssl/sha.h>
...
char data[] = "data to hash";
char hash[SHA512_DIGEST_LENGTH];
SHA512(data, sizeof(data), hash);

// 'hash' now contains the raw 64-byte binary hash.  If you want to print it out
// in a human-readable format, you'll need to convert it to hex, e.g.
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1  
Helpful answer! However, I think you need to do sizeof(data)-1 to exclude the terminating null character. –  JustinB Feb 16 at 20:53
1  
@JustinB yeah or he could use strlen(data) –  yentup Apr 15 at 13:40
    
And thanks, I needed to see this answer. –  yentup Apr 15 at 13:47

You can use GLib for this matter, be aware of G_CHECKSUM_SHA512, it might require you to install a newer version of GLib, visit: https://developer.gnome.org/glib/stable/glib-Data-Checksums.html

#include <glib.h>
#include <string.h>

int
main(void)
{
        char   *string  = "Hello World";
        gchar  *sha512;

        sha512 = g_compute_checksum_for_string(G_CHECKSUM_SHA512, string, strlen(string));
        g_print("%s\n", sha512);
        g_free(sha512);
        return 0; 
}

compile

$ gcc -o sha512 sha512.c `pkg-config --cflags --libs glib-2.0`
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If you want to store passwords using SHA-512, please consider using a "salt" value to make rainbow-table attacks harder. Example, "12345678" would be a random string. "$6$" marks SHA-512:

#include <crypt.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    char *hash = crypt("secret", "$6$12345678");
    printf("hashed=%s\n", hash);
}
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Thank u for the answer, i've found an SHA1 code, ans i used it, it's better than MD5 and still strong too. i will use salts values with the passwords and store the hashes in a file, only the super user can access that file. If i'm wrong correct me . –  badr assa Jul 7 '13 at 0:51

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