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I have this code below which is making a fluid div next to a fixed div,

is there a way to get this same result without using float?

<div id="wrapper" style="width: 100%">
  <div id="left" style="background-color: Blue; height: 100px; float: right; width:     200px;margin-left:10px;"></div>
  <div id="right" style="background-color: #5a71e5; height: 100px; margin-right: 210px;">
</div>

jsfiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/3P9XN/4/

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you have float: right on the #left div.... –  Gnuey Jul 3 '13 at 19:24
    
Your left div appears on right and right on left. –  Learner Jul 3 '13 at 19:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here inline-block is not an option since you cannot make the container on the left take up "as much space" as there is available.

If you don't want to use float (and suppose js is too much) I would call for the last resort:

<table/> - [dramatic ta -ta -ta -taaaaaa]

Where you meet a scenario where some elements should be fix sized and other should just take up as much as there is for them, then if you think of it this is what tables basically do. I know we've been booed away a lot of times from using tables for layouting, but if the behavior requires it, than let's not go and create complex workaround, but use something that behaves as we expect them to behave.

On the other hand tables are a big no-no for responsive design.

DEMO

HTML

<table class="wrapper">
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td class="left"></td>
            <td class="right"></td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

CSS

.wrapper {
    width: 100%;
}
.right {
    background-color: Blue;
    height: 100px;
    width: 200px;
}
.left {
    background-color: #5a71e5;
    height: 100px; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
nice solution :) –  Lir An Jul 3 '13 at 19:43
    
The problem here is that in the original post, the .left element is place do the right of the layout... this table based solution yields a different layout, which may be nice and acceptable, but it is a solution with to a different problem. –  Marc Audet Jul 3 '13 at 19:48
    
I know, and I've changed it willingly, since a container IDd left that is positioned on the right is not really a left container and should be a right container. And I've also switched to classes, since I believe ids should be used carefully. And anyway Lir An's question is only based on a bet (as the updated comment does not show it anymore :) ) So I don't believe the stockmarkets are going to crash because I've renamed some containers –  Matyas Jul 3 '13 at 19:50
3  
It is hard to guess what the OP intended, but that aside, you could have achieved the same effect using display: table-cell and retained the same mark-up. –  Marc Audet Jul 3 '13 at 19:55
1  
I agree with Marc. display:table-cell is a much more elegant solution here, with the added bonus of it working just fine in a responsive design by setting it back to display:block when viewed on handheld devices. Please don't use HTML tables for display. We've come too far to go back to that. –  Tim Wasson Jul 3 '13 at 19:58

Not sure if you are open to using jQuery. If yes, here's what you can do:

Get Rid of all the floats, add display:inline-block to the wrapper div, use jQuery to calculate the difference between total wrapper width minus left div width and set that to right div.

HTML

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="left">left</div>
    <div id="right">right</div>
</div>

CSS

#left{
    background-color: Blue; 
    height: 100px; 
    width: 200px;
    margin-left:10px;
}

#right{
    background-color: #5a71e5; 
    height: 100px; 
}

#wrapper div {
    display: inline-block;
}

#wrapper{
    width:100%;
}

jQuery

$('#right').width($('#wrapper').width() - $('#left').width() - 20);

Sample Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/3P9XN/12/

Update

Added window resize detection for responsiveness

http://jsfiddle.net/3P9XN/14/

Update2

Updated the solution as per Marc's suggestions, now getting outerWidth and css margin values through script. More dynamic and cleaner approach.

jQuery

 $(document).ready(setRightWidth);

 $(window).resize(setRightWidth);

 function setRightWidth(){
        var leftmargin = parseFloat($('#left').css('margin-left'));
        var width = $('#wrapper').outerWidth(true) - $('#left').outerWidth(true) - leftmargin;
        $('#right').width(width);
 }

http://jsfiddle.net/3P9XN/17/

share|improve this answer
    
This technique is very useful and worth noting. You may want to add that if the left and right blocks have padding and borders, you should use jQuery's .outerWidth() method. You could also avoid the hard-coded "20" by pulling in the value of margin-left as a JavaScript variable. Overall, a good solution. +1 –  Marc Audet Jul 3 '13 at 19:52
    
Thanks for the suggestions Marc. Answer updated. I know that questioner's issue has been solved but I thought this might be useful to others in future. –  Learner Jul 3 '13 at 20:29

You could always try absolute positioning since you have a pretty well defined height and widths.

#wrapper {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100px;
    border: 1px dotted gray;
    position: relative;

}
#left {
    position: absolute;
    right: 0;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    width: 200px;
    background-color: blue;
}
#right {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    right: 210px;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    background-color: #5a71e5;
}

The HTML remains the same... minus the inline styles of course.

Demo fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/audetwebdesign/QypQG/

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