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My basic question is this. If I pass no parameters to my package -- DbIoFunc's routine OpenIcsDB() why is the pacakge name in @_?

I am expecting @_ to be null when I pass no parameters to the following function, but instead the parameter contains the package name. I have tried calling with class -> and :: syntax, and there is no difference.

What should I test to determine if no parameter was passed other than the following?

my ($Temp, $DBPathLocal) = @_; 

if(!defined $DBPathLocal)
{
    $DBPathLocal = DBDEV;
}

I'm wondering two things. Why is the package name part of @_ and is what I've done the best way to get rid of the package name?

Here is the call:

my ($DBHand);
$DBHand = DbIoFunc->OpenIcsDb();

Here is the function:

sub OpenIcsDb
#
# DB Path Constant DBPROD or DBDEV.
#
{
    # Path passed in, either DBPROD or DBDEV
    my ($DBPathLocal); 

    my ($DBSuffix);
    my ($DBHand);      # ICS database handle

    $DBPathLocal = shift;

    #
    # Make sure the database path exists.
    #

    if (length($DBPathLocal) <= 0)
    {
        if (!$Debugging)
        {
            $DBPathLocal= DBPROD;
        }
        else
        {
            $DBPathLocal = DBDEV;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        $DBPathLocal = DBDEV;
    }

    my $DBSuffix = DBSUFFIX;

    $! = 2;
    die("Can't find database directory ".$DBPathLocal.".".$DBSuffix)
    unless ((-e $DBPathLocal.".".$DBSuffix) && (-d $DBPathLocal.".".$DBSuffix));
    #
    # See if we can connect to the ICS database.  We can't proceed without it.
    #
    $DBHand = DBI->connect("dbi:Informix:".$DBPathLocal, "", "")
        or die("Can't connect to the ICS database ".$DBPathLocal);

    return $DBHand;
}
share|improve this question
1  
if (defined $yourVar) –  stackErr Jul 3 '13 at 19:30
1  
Why transform conditionals into unreadable constructs? The nested if block could've been trivially written as a single conditional. –  devnull Jul 3 '13 at 19:36
    
@stackErr If I shift @_ into $DBHand, I get the package name, so the parameter is not undef. I am not seeing how to determine if the parameter is not present. –  octopusgrabbus Jul 3 '13 at 19:40
    
Is it quite intentional that length($DBPathLocal) is checked to be possibly less than zero? –  pilcrow Jul 3 '13 at 20:15
    
I'm not sure what you expect length(@_) to do, but it'll never be 0. –  darch Jul 3 '13 at 20:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To do OOP, Perl has to know the package name or the object's reference to work. If you use the :: call method, you avoid this.

package Foo;

sub bar {
  print "@_\n";
}

package main;

Foo->bar();
Foo::bar();
bar Foo();

Note that the call to Foo::bar(); does not print the package name.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'll check this out after the holiday weekend. I'll go see if the package name prints. I'm inclined to use class syntax, given that's used all over our Perl code -- there is quite a bit of it -- and I like continuity. I've gone for a package name throw away concept that I put in the edited OP. –  octopusgrabbus Jul 4 '13 at 14:22

You probably want to call the function as DbIoFunc::OpenIcsDb(). Using the arrow operator does some object stuff.

share|improve this answer
1  
Or if it's supposed to be a "class method", skip or verify the classname argument. –  aschepler Jul 3 '13 at 19:32
    
It's a method in a package. –  octopusgrabbus Jul 3 '13 at 19:40
    
@aschepler I know this is perl and TIMTOWTDI, but I would assume that if he meant to be calling class methods there would be a "new" in here somewhere. –  AKHolland Jul 3 '13 at 19:43
1  
@AKHolland In perl, "new" is only useful for calling a method which is actually named "new". –  aschepler Jul 3 '13 at 19:58
    
@aschepler I'm aware of that, hence the disclaimer at the beginning of my previous comment. However, in general, if someone meant to be using object methods they would create an object with new first. –  AKHolland Jul 3 '13 at 20:28

I have tried calling with class -> and :: syntax, and there is no difference.

There is a difference. If you use :: and pass no other parameters then @_ will be empty. You can confirm this fact by inserting the following code at the top of the function:

print '@_ contains ' . scalar(@_) . " elements\n";

Your real problem might be here:

$DBPathLocal = shift;
if (length($DBPathLocal) <= 0)

If @_ is empty then $DBPathLocal will be undef. And length(undef) is always undef. And undef <= 0 is always true.

Protip:

use warnings;
use strict;
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry. @_ was not empty, when I passed no parameters. This is perl, v5.10.1 (*) built for i386-linux-thread-multi –  octopusgrabbus Jul 3 '13 at 21:46
    
@octopusgrabbus I edited my answer. Try inserting the print line I added and see what it says. –  Oktalist Jul 3 '13 at 21:49
    
What I've decided to do is throw away the Package name in a scalar variable. Most of our Perl code uses -> syntax, and I want to keep using it for continuity. –  octopusgrabbus Jul 3 '13 at 21:53

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