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Not a school related question, but it comes up in the Dragon Book (Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools) in an exercise:

The grammar:

S ::= aSa | aa

generates all even length strings of a's except for the empty string.

a) Construct a recursive-descent parser with backtracking for this grammar that tries the alternative aSa before aa. Show that the procedure for S succeeds on 2, 4, or 8 a's, but fails on 6 a's. b) What language does your parser recognize?

I'm stumped. It seems like if 4 a's is recognized as S, and two a's between an S is recognized, then 6 a's should be recognized. I tried implementing the parser in C but this one recognizes all even numbers of a's as well. It's not failing to recognize 6 a's. What does this exercise have in mind?

/* A C implementation of Exercise 4.13 in the Dragon Book */

/* The grammar:

   S ::= aSa | aa

*/

/* Construct a recursive-descent parser with backtracking for this grammar 
   that tries the alternative aSa before aa. Show that the procedure for S 
   succeeds on 2, 4, or 8 a's, but fails on 6 a's. 
*/

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int S(const char *str, int start, int end);
int aSa(const char *str, int start, int end);
int aa(const char *str, int start, int end);

/* returns 1 if a match, 0 otherwise */
int S(const char *str, int start, int end)
{
  if(aSa(str, start, end))
    return 1;
  else
    if(aa(str, start, end))
      return 1;
  return 0;
}

/* returns 1 if a match, 0 otherwise */
int aSa(const char *str, int start, int end)
{
  int len = end - start;
  if (len < 3)
    return 0;
  if(str[0] != 'a')
    return 0;
  if (!S(str, start+1, end-1))
    return 0;
  if(str[len-1] != 'a')
    return 0;
  return 1;
}

/* returns 1 if a match, 0 otherwise */
int aa(const char *str, int start, int end)
{
  int len = end - start;
  if(len != 2)
    return 0;
  if(str[0] == str[1] && str[0] == 'a')
    return 1;
  return 0;
}

int main()
{
  char str[20];
  printf("Enter a string: \n");
  scanf("%s", str);
  int match = S(str, 0, strlen(str));
  if(match)
    printf("The string %s matches\n", str);
  else
    printf("The string %s does not match\n", str);
  return 0;
}
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Could divisibility by 3 have anything to do with what the parser is expecting? Just an idea. –  usumoio Jul 3 '13 at 19:59
    
I'm not familiar with all the jargon, but I suspect passing end-1 to S is cheating for a "recursive descent parser". –  aschepler Jul 3 '13 at 20:06
    
@aschepler: that is, in fact, the key to the problem. The example code is not a backtracking parser! :-) –  torek Jul 3 '13 at 20:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Even with backtracking, which requires being able to rewind the input stream, a recursive descent parser is not allowed to look ahead to the end of the input, nor is it allowed to remove symbols from both ends of the stream.

A left-to-right parser must be able to work with an input stream which has only one method:

get() : consume and read one symbol, or return an EOF symbol.

The backtracking version needs a stream with two more methods:

posn = tell()  : return an opaque value which can be used in seek()
seek(posn)     : reposition the stream to a previous position returned by tell()
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Oh ok. I changed my program to use those functions and now it acts the way it should. Thanks. –  Daniel Dilger Jul 4 '13 at 1:32

The problem isn't the fact that this is a backtracking or recursive descent parser; the problem is that the described implementation does not properly consider the outer context of the recursive descent parse. This is similar to the difference between a Strong LL (SLL) parser and an LL parser.

The shortest input for which the strange behavior is demonstrated is aaaaaa.

  1. We start in rule S, and match the 1st a.
  2. We invoke S.
    • We match the 2nd a.
    • We invoke S. I'll omit the specific steps, but the key is this invocation of S matches aaaa, which is the 3rd a through the end of the input. (See note that follows.)
    • We try to match a, but since the end of the input was already reached, we go back and match just the 2nd through 3rd aa.
  3. We match the 4th a.

Additional note about the inner call to S that matched aaaa: If we knew to reserve an a at the end of the input for step 3, then the inner call to S could have matched aa instead of aaaa, leading to a successful parse of the complete input aaaaaa. ANTLR 4 provides this "full context" parsing ability in a recursive descent parser, and is the first recursive descent LL parser able to correctly match aa instead of aaaa for this nested invocation of S.

An SLL parser matches a2k for this grammar. A proper LL parser (such as ANTLR 4) matches a2k for this grammar.

share|improve this answer
    
great explanation, but is it fair to call that recursive descent? isn't recursive descent traditionally used to describe the "naive" implementation? –  andrew cooke Jul 4 '13 at 1:36
    
If you look at the code generated by ANTLR 4, it's about as clearly recursive descent as you can get. The difference between its code and backtracking or other implementations is the implementation of the method that determines which non-terminal to expand at a decision point. –  280Z28 Jul 4 '13 at 2:59

there's no way i'm going to write this in c for fun, but here's the parser written in python, as simple as i can make it (i hope it's clear as pseudocode, even if you don't know this language):

class Backtrack(Exception): pass

def asa(input):
    if input[0:1] == 'a':
        parsed, remaining = s(input[1:])
        if remaining[0:1] == 'a':
            return 'a' + parsed + 'a', remaining[1:]
    raise Backtrack

def aa(input):
    if input[0:2] == 'aa':
        return 'aa', input[2:]
    raise Backtrack

def s(input):
    try:
        return asa(input)
    except Backtrack:
        return aa(input)

for i in range(17):
    print(i, ': ', end='')
    try:
        print(s('a' * i))
    except Backtrack:
        print('failed')

and the results as length: (parsed, remaining):

0 : failed
1 : failed
2 : ('aa', '')
3 : ('aa', 'a')
4 : ('aaaa', '')
5 : ('aa', 'aaa')
6 : ('aaaa', 'aa')
7 : ('aaaaaa', 'a')
8 : ('aaaaaaaa', '')
9 : ('aa', 'aaaaaaa')
10 : ('aaaa', 'aaaaaa')
11 : ('aaaaaa', 'aaaaa')
12 : ('aaaaaaaa', 'aaaa')
13 : ('aaaaaaaaaa', 'aaa')
14 : ('aaaaaaaaaaaa', 'aa')
15 : ('aaaaaaaaaaaaaa', 'a')
16 : ('aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa', '')

which i suspect will help you understand. the short answer is that recursive descent is a very specific, limited thing. it's not a complete search.

(it's a good question really. makes an important point. good book.)

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