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I have 3 classes: A,B and C.

Class A contains 2 objects of type B. Class C (the "container") has a list of A objects, and since sometimes i need to iterate directly on all of the created B objects, a list of the B objects contained by the A objects.

class A {
    private B b1;
    private B b2;
    ...
}
class B {...}
class C {
    List<A> aList;
    List<B> bList;
    ...
    }

This is redundant and clearly error prone.

Is there a way to iterate on the set of all the B objects contained by the A objects in aList?

I'm looking for some syntactic sugar to avoid code like:

public B hasFoo(Q){
   for(A a:aList){
     if(a.getB1().hasFoo(Q))return a.getB1();
     if(a.getB2().hasFoo(Q))return a.getB2();
   }
}
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1  
Did you try it? –  Jeffrey Jul 3 '13 at 20:40
    
Why can't you access the B properties by iterating over List<A>? That really won't take you much extra work. –  Rohit Jain Jul 3 '13 at 20:41
    
Made question more clear, i'm looking for a prettier way of doing it! –  Enoon Jul 3 '13 at 20:50
    
Don't make things private if you want to access them from the outside. Private means it can only be accessed from within the class. –  Thijser Jul 3 '13 at 21:03
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you have a lot of different operations you'd want to perform on both b1 and b2 (not just hasFoo()), you could set up an iterator in A that lets you loop through both b1 and b2. Something like this works, although it looks sort of hacky:

class A {
   private B b1;
   private B b2;

   private class TheBees implements Iterable<B> {
     public Iterator<B> iterator() {
       return new Iterator<B> () {
         private int which = 0;
         public boolean hasNext() { return which < 2; }
         public B next() {
           which++;
           if (which == 1) return b1;
           if (which == 2) return b2;
           throw new NoSuchElementException ();
         }
         public void remove() { throw new UnsupportedOperationException (); }
       };
     }
   }

   public Iterable<B> theBees () {
     return (new TheBees ());
   }

   // other stuff...
}

and now you could write

for (A a : aList) {
   for (B b : a.theBees())
       if (b.hasFoo(Q)) return b;
}

That's an awful lot of junk to add just to make this one loop look better. But if this is a pattern you'd use a lot, and with other things besides hasFoo(), it might be worthwhile. If you want to make it less hacky, I'd modify A to hold a two-element array of B (instead of b1 and b2), and then TheBees.iterator() could just return Arrays.asList(bArray).iterator() [note: I haven't tried it].

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Unfortunately, the answer is no, there is no more concise way to write what you have already.

Without an additional redundant data structure, you will need to iterate over all of the A objects, and then all of the B objects contained within them just as in your example.

A slight design improvement may be to have the A objects perform the iteration of their B objects themselves. E.g.

// In class A
public B getAppropriateB(Q)
{
    if (B1.hasFoo(Q)) return B1;
    if (B2.hasFoo(Q)) return B2;
    return null;  // or throw an exception...
}

And then in class C:

public B hasFoo(Q){
    for(A a:aList){
        B b = a.hasAppropriateB(Q);
        if (b != null) return b;
    }
}

However, this does not save you any characters, if that is specifically what you are looking for.

If you have a lot of B objects per each A object (more than just 2 as illustrated in your example), then it may (a very tentative and conditional may) be worthwhile to use reflection to iterate over the B objects. This is most likely (almost definitely) unwise unless it is infeasible to write the B iteration code directly.

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If 'B' needs to be accessed (logically) outside of it's class, there's no use making it private. So just make B public but make sure you provide a standard getter and setter instead of addressing the fields directly.

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1  
I was more looking for some syntactic sugar, i know how to access it :) - i'm editing the question to make this more clear! –  Enoon Jul 3 '13 at 20:46
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