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I am talking in the context of event handler in a C# windows forms, but I'm assuming the answer could be used anywhere in C#.

To give an example, I have a form that has many check boxes that each activate a button. The CheckedChanged event is handled by a function that is very similar for each CheckBox and it looks something like this right now:

private void acheckbox_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    int uniquetocheckbox = 12345;

    if(acheckbox.CheckedChanged)
    {
          ThisFunction(uniquetocheckbox, true);
          AssociatedButton.Enabled = true;
    }
    else
    {
          ThisFunction(uniquetocheckbox, false);
          AssociatedButton.Enabled = false;
    }  
}

There are a lot of these check boxes and I'm trying to cut and past the code for each and make as few changes as possible so I want to do something like this :

private void acheckbox_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    int uniquetocheckbox = 12345;

    if((CheckBox)sender.Checked)  //CHANGE HERE
    {
          ThisFunction(uniquetocheckbox, true);
          AssociatedButton.Enabled = true;
    }
    else
    {
          ThisFunction(uniquetocheckbox, false);
          AssociatedButton.Enabled = false;
    }  
}

This does not work. The easy work around is this :

private void acheckbox_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    int uniquetocheckbox = 12345;
    CheckBox cb = (CheckBox)sender;

    if(cb.Checked)  //CHANGE HERE
    {
          ThisFunction(uniquetocheckbox, true);
          AssociatedButton.Enabled = true;
    }
    else
    {
          ThisFunction(uniquetocheckbox, false);
          AssociatedButton.Enabled = false;
    }  
}

But out of pure curiosity I am wondering if there is a way to do it in one line like the second example I gave. I would like to know because I think it looks better and is obviously 1 line shorter.

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4  
Doesn't ((CheckBox)sender).Checked work? –  RBarryYoung Jul 3 '13 at 20:54
1  
In addition to the answers, you can make it even shorter by doing: var isChecked = ((CheckBox)sender).Checked; ThisFunction(uniquetocheckbox, isChecked); AssociatedButton.Enabled = isChecked; –  Mike McCaughan Jul 3 '13 at 20:58
    
Yes, I overlooked something simple. Upvoting all answers, accepting first correct one. –  SmashCode Jul 3 '13 at 20:59
    
@MikeMcCaughan brilliant, didn't even think about that. Will be implementing that. –  SmashCode Jul 3 '13 at 20:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think you're just missing a set of parenthesis. You want to cast to Checkbox, then get the properties of that:

if (((CheckBox)sender).Checked)

This will force the order of operations to cast first, then get the property from the cast result.

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You should point out that the OPs syntax was attempting to cast the result from the .Checked property, to make it clear why the code didn't work. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jul 3 '13 at 21:19

Sure, it's possible. You just missed another set of brackets:

if(((CheckBox)sender).Checked)

However, I wouldn't do this. Why? You don't want to cast again if you want to access the sender as a textbox again if you did it your way.

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You can. For example:

object o;
o = new SomeType();
var prop = ((SomeType)o).SomeProperty;
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It needs to be this:

if(((CheckBox)sender).Checked)  //CHANGE HERE

But personally I like the way you've shown better. That way if it needs to be casted again, it's already been done.

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Don't know any C# but ((CheckBox)sender).Checked) should work. In java the "." (member access) has higher priority than casting so putting the parenthesis like this should force the casting to happen first.

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You just need a couple of more parenthesis in your if statement:

if (((CheckBox)sender).Checked)
{
    ...
}
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