Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to apply odd/even selectors to all elements in a list with the class parent.

HTML:

<ul>
    <li class="parent">green</li>
    <li class="parent">red</li>
    <li>ho ho ho</li>
    <li class="parent">green</li>
    <li class="parent">red</li>
</ul>

CSS:

.parent:nth-child(odd) {
    background-color: green;
}

.parent:nth-child(even) {
    background-color: red;
}

ul {
    width:100px;
    height: 100px;
    display: block;
}

enter image description here

Link to jsFiddle

Is there a way to do this? I want the list items to be the color of the text.

share|improve this question
1  
You need to apply nth-child to the ul, not the list. –  Aleks G Jul 3 '13 at 21:48
1  
I'm not sure what your question is –  Cody Guldner Jul 3 '13 at 21:52
    
@CodyGuldner: He wants the "ho ho ho" to not count for purposes of zebra striping. –  Jon Jul 3 '13 at 21:54
    
@AleksG Hum, I can't get that to work, do you mind showing me in a jsFiddle? Do it as an answer and I will accept it. –  nilsi Jul 3 '13 at 21:55
    
@CodyGuldner Yes, like Jon says –  nilsi Jul 3 '13 at 21:56
show 3 more comments

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

In general what you want is not possible, but there is a way to achieve the desired behavior for limited numbers of "excluded" elements: the general sibling combinator ~.

The idea is that for each occurrence of a non-.parent element subsequent .parent elements will have their colors toggled:

.parent:nth-child(odd) {
    background-color: green;
}
.parent:nth-child(even) {
    background-color: red;
}

/* after the first non-.parent, toggle colors */
li:not(.parent) ~ .parent:nth-child(odd) {
    background-color: red;
}
li:not(.parent) ~ .parent:nth-child(even) {
    background-color: green;
}

/* after the second non-.parent, toggle again */
li:not(.parent) ~ li:not(.parent) ~ .parent:nth-child(odd) {
    background-color: green;
}
li:not(.parent) ~ li:not(.parent) ~ .parent:nth-child(even) {
    background-color: red;
}

See it in action.

Of course there is a limit to how far one would be willing to take this, but it's as close as you can get with pure CSS.

share|improve this answer
1  
I gave you a +1 for the answer, but I will reiterate your last sentence about the limits of pure CSS. All CSS only solutions require a very limited number of items one is dealing with to be manageable. –  ScottS Jul 3 '13 at 22:14
    
Thank you, seems like I have to go JS on this one then.. –  nilsi Jul 3 '13 at 22:19
1  
@ScottS: Definitely. In general one should go with JS here, but there may be fringe cases where the technique is useful. –  Jon Jul 3 '13 at 22:20
add comment

This is a common misperception

The :nth-child and :nth-of-type selectors do not look at "class" or anything else for counting. They only look at either (1) all elements, or (2) all elements of a certain "type" (not class, not an attribute, nothing but the type of element--div or li etc.).

So you cannot skip it with pure CSS without either knowing your exact html structure (and then, only if there are in fact a few elements you are dealing with--see Jon's answer for one such way, where you need to know how many non-parent elements you are dealing with, and as you can see and he notes the practical limits are very small), or by using javascript.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It will be possible only with CSS Selectors 4 which will have nth-match.

In the existing CSS it can be done only in some limited situations using the general sibling combinator multuple times, like in @Jon's answer or even in a more 'mechanical' way (example):

.parent,
.parent ~ .parent ~ .parent,
.parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent,
.parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent
{
    background-color: green;
}

.parent ~ .parent,
.parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent,
.parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent,
.parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent ~ .parent
{
    background-color: red;
}

In practice, it seems better to me to use JS/jQuery for this.

share|improve this answer
add comment

CSS

The other reliable way to replicate this currently is with the adjacent sibling selector:

.parent,
.parent + .parent + .parent,
.parent + .parent + .parent + .parent + .parent /* etc */
{ background-color: green; }

.parent + .parent,
.parent + .parent + .parent + .parent /* etc */
{ background-color: red; }

You have three options:

  • Use the not() selector. This will keep your highlighting going indefinitely, but it will occasionally flip the order that it highlights in. Use this option if your list could have huge groupings of the elements you want to highlight.
  • Use the + (adjacent sibling) selector. This option will not keep highlighting indefinitely, but it guarantees that the order will never be flipped. Use this option if your list will have smaller groupings of highlighted elements together.
  • Use the ~ (any sibling) selector. I would not recommend this as the list will fail to highlight properly based on total list length rather than total matching siblings. This will always fail before the other two options, and more noticeably.

Fiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/corymcd/kVcZJ/

Feel free to copy the HTML from this and paste it into the ones that the other people demonstrated their methods with.

jQuery

As stated before, using something like jQuery would easily allow you to either assign your elements even/odd classes or simply change the inline style.

// Find all objects to highlight, remove all of the highlighting classes, 
// and then re-highlight.
$(".parent").removeClass('odd even').each(function(index) {
    var objPrev = $(this).prev('.parent');
    if( objPrev.hasClass('odd') ) {
        $(this).addClass('even');
    } else {
        $(this).addClass('odd');
    }    
});

Fiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/corymcd/kAPvX

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.