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Im a python beginner. I just picked it up last week. Im trying to create a symmetric word matrix from a text document.

For example: text = "Barbara is good. Barbara is friends with Benny. Benny is bad."

I have tokenized the text document using nltk. Now I want to count how many times other words appear in the same sentence. From the text above, I want to create the matrix below:

        Barbara good    friends Benny   bad
Barbara 2   1   1   1   0
good    1   1   0   0   0
friends 1   0   1   1   0
Benny   1   0   1   2   1
bad     0   0   1   1   1

Note the diagonals are the frequency of the word. Since Barbara appears with Barbara in a sentence as often as there are Barbaras. I hope to not over count, but this is not a big issue if the codes becomes too complicated.

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What is the question? –  Brian Cain Jul 3 '13 at 22:00
    
How do I create a matrix above from text ? –  mumpy Jul 3 '13 at 22:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First we tokenize the text, iterate through each sentence, and iterate through all pairwise combinations of the words in each sentence, and store out counts in a nested dict:

from nltk.tokenize import word_tokenize, sent_tokenize
from collections import defaultdict
import numpy as np
text = "Barbara is good. Barbara is friends with Benny. Benny is bad."

sparse_matrix = defaultdict(lambda: defaultdict(lambda: 0))

for sent in sent_tokenize(text):
    words = word_tokenize(sent)
    for word1 in words:
        for word2 in words:
            sparse_matrix[word1][word2]+=1

print sparse_matrix
>> defaultdict(<function <lambda> at 0x7f46bc3587d0>, {
'good': defaultdict(<function <lambda> at 0x3504320>, 
    {'is': 1, 'good': 1, 'Barbara': 1, '.': 1}), 
'friends': defaultdict(<function <lambda> at 0x3504410>, 
    {'friends': 1, 'is': 1, 'Benny': 1, '.': 1, 'Barbara': 1, 'with': 1}), etc..

This is essentially like a matrix, in that we can index sparse_matrix['good']['Barbara'] and get the number 1, and index sparse_matrix['bad']['Barbara'] and get 0, but we actually aren't storing counts for any words that never co-occured, the 0 is just generated by the defaultdict only when you ask for it. This can really save a lot of memory when doing this stuff. If we need a dense matrix for some type of linear algebra or other computational reason, we can get it like this:

lexicon_size=len(sparse_matrix)
def mod_hash(x, m):
    return hash(x) % m
dense_matrix = np.zeros((lexicon_size, lexicon_size))

for k in sparse_matrix.iterkeys():
    for k2 in sparse_matrix[k].iterkeys():
        dense_matrix[mod_hash(k, lexicon_size)][mod_hash(k2, lexicon_size)] = \
            sparse_matrix[k][k2]

print dense_matrix
>>
[[ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
 [ 0.  0.  1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  1.]
 [ 0.  0.  1.  1.  1.  0.  0.  1.]
 [ 0.  0.  1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  1.]
 [ 0.  0.  1.  0.  1.  2.  0.  2.]
 [ 0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.]
 [ 0.  0.  1.  1.  1.  2.  0.  3.]]

I would recommend looking at http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/sparse.html for other ways of dealing with matrix sparsity.

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Thank you big time! I also appreciate your link on sparse matrices. Cheers! –  mumpy Jul 7 '13 at 5:05

I would first set up with something like the following. Possibly add in tokenization of some sort; though for your example none was needed.

text = """Barbara is good. Barbara is friends with Benny. Benny is bad."""
allwords = text.replace('.','').split(' ')
word_to_index = {}
index_to_word = {}
index = 0
for word in allwords:
    if word not in word_to_index:
         word_to_index[word] = index
         index_to_word[index] = word
         index += 1
word_count = index

>>> index_to_word
{0: 'Barbara',
 1: 'is',
 2: 'good',
 3: 'friends',
 4: 'with',
 5: 'Benny',
 6: 'bad'}

>>> word_to_index
{'Barbara': 0,
 'Benny': 5,
 'bad': 6,
 'friends': 3,
 'good': 2,
 'is': 1,
 'with': 4}

Then declare a matrix of the proper size (word_count x word_count); possibly using numpy like

import numpy
matrix = numpy.zeros((word_count, word_count))

or just simply a nested list:

matrix = [None,]*word_count
for i in range(word_count):
    matrix[i] = [0,]*word_count

Note this is tricky and something like matrix = [[0]*word_count]*word_count will not work as that would make an list with 7 references to the same inner array (e.g., if you try that code and then do matrix[0][1] = 1, you'll find matrix[1][1], matrix[2][1], etc. will also be changed to 1).

Then you need to just iterate through your sentences.

sentences = text.split('.')
for sent in sentences:
   for word1 in sent.split(' '):
       if word1 not in word_to_index:
           continue
       for word2 in sent.split(' '):
           if word2 not in word_to_index:
               continue
           matrix[word_to_index[word1]][word_to_index[word2]] += 1

Then you get:

>>> matrix

[[2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0],
 [2, 3, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1],
 [1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
 [1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0],
 [1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0],
 [1, 2, 0, 1, 1, 2, 1],
 [0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1]]

Or if you were curious what say the frequency of 'Benny' and 'bad' you could ask matrix[word_to_index['Benny']][word_to_index['bad']].

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! I appreciate your help. –  mumpy Jul 7 '13 at 4:22
    
I wish i could choose two answers -both of your answers are very helpful for my analysis. Cheers! –  mumpy Jul 7 '13 at 5:06

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