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I have the function:

def g(R, r):
    return (np.sqrt(2.0 * (R + r) / (r * R)) - (1 + np.sqrt(R)) / np.sqrt(R) -
            np.sqrt(2.0 / (r * (1 + r))) * (1 - r) -
            (1.0 / np.sqrt(R) - np.sqrt(2.0) * (1 - R) / np.sqrt(R * (1 + R))
             - 1))

The function is defined by setting delta v_B = delta v_H where delta v_B is

np.sqrt(2.0 * (R + r) / (r * R)) - (1 + np.sqrt(R)) / np.sqrt(R) -
                np.sqrt(2.0 / (r * (1 + r))) * (1 - r)

and delta v_H is

1.0 / np.sqrt(R) - np.sqrt(2.0) * (1 - R) / np.sqrt(R * (1 + R)) - 1

Therefore, I wrote g as delta v_b - delta v_H.

Now this is my function and the code I am using below:

import pylab
import numby as np


def g(R, r):
    return (np.sqrt(2.0 * (R + r) / (r * R)) - (1 + np.sqrt(R)) / np.sqrt(R) -
            np.sqrt(2.0 / (r * (1 + r))) * (1 - r) -
            (1.0 / np.sqrt(R) - np.sqrt(2.0) * (1 - R) / np.sqrt(R * (1 + R))
             - 1))


r = np.linspace(11.9, 16, 500000)
R = np.linspace(1, 20, 500000)

fig2 = pylab.figure()
ax2 = fig2.add_subplot(111)
ax2.plot(R, g(R, r), 'r')
pylab.xlabel('$R_1 = \\frac{r_C}{r_A}$')
pylab.ylabel('$R_2 = \\frac{r_B}{r_A}$')
pylab.xlim((0, 25))
pylab.ylim((0, 100))                               

pylab.show()

The function should asymptote to infinity at about 11.94 and intersect the line y = x at around 15.58

How can I make such a plot? I am not familiar with how to do this, and I don't know how to plot such a function.

Is my definition improper for g as g(R, r)? If so, how should it be defined if this isn't the case?

enter image description here

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What is the mean of "the function should asymptote to infinity at about 11.94" I'm not understand, why one component only?. And, what is r,R, they are lengths? –  Pablo Jul 4 '13 at 0:18
    
@Pablo at 11.94 the function go up to positive infinity but not crossing that value only approaching it. Little 'r' is supposed to be y axis values. I will draw a poor picture to show you what I mean. –  dustin Jul 4 '13 at 0:20
    
@Pablo I added my horrible drawing. –  dustin Jul 4 '13 at 0:23
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is call Implicit function curve, you can use contour to draw it with argument levels=[0]:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

def g(R, r):
    return (np.sqrt(2.0 * (R + r) / (r * R)) - (1 + np.sqrt(R)) / np.sqrt(R) -
            np.sqrt(2.0 / (r * (1 + r))) * (1 - r) -
            (1.0 / np.sqrt(R) - np.sqrt(2.0) * (1 - R) / np.sqrt(R * (1 + R))
             - 1))

R, r = np.mgrid[1:30:200j, 1:100:200j]
Z = g(R,r)
plt.contour(R, r, Z, colors='k', levels=[0]) 
plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
How can I clip the curved portion under y=x? –  dustin Jul 5 '13 at 2:38
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