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Although I may be very confused as to what the property() function does, I'm trying to use it to create an attribute which is read-only. Ideally, I'd like to be able to refer to the attribute directly but not be allowed to assign to it. When experimenting, I got this very curious behavior:

>>> class Boo(object):
...     def __init__(self, x):
...             self.__x = x
...     def getx(self):
...             return self.__x
...     x = property(getx)
... 
>>> b = Boo(1)
>>> b.__x = 2
>>> b.getx()
1
>>> b.__x
2

I'd like to add that when I used x and _x as the attribute names, reassigning the attribute caused the getter to return the changed value, i.e. both b.getx() and b.x/b._x gave me 2.

I realize that I'm using x as the property name, though, but when I tried the following I got an AttributeError in my __init__():

>>> class Boo(object):
...     def __init__(self, x):
...             self.__x = x
...     def getx(self):
...             return self.__x
...     __x = property(getx)
... 
>>> b = Boo(1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in __init__
AttributeError: can't set attribute
share|improve this question
    
I'd like to add that I wasn't trying to get a truly private variable, just one that couldn't be modified after it was assigned. (I realize that I can't have my cake and eat it too - Python's not Java and so forth. Was just curious about the behavior and how far I could get with property().) –  2rs2ts Jul 4 '13 at 0:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem here has nothing to do with property, but with double-underscore attributes, which are subject to what's called "Private name mangling".

>>> b = Boo(1)
>>> '__x' in dir(b)
False
>>> '_Boo__x' in dir(b)
True

So, when you do this:

>>> b.__x = 2

You're not changing the value of the attribute the getx function is looking at, you're creating a new attribute.

If you just use a name for the attribute that doesn't start with two underscores—such as _x—everything works as you intended.

As a general rule, use a single underscore for "advisory private"—as in, "users of this object probably shouldn't care about this value", and a double underscore only when you actually need mangling (because of complex inheritance issues that rarely come up).

What if you want "real private", like C++ or Java? You can't have it. If you hide or protect the attribute well enough, someone will just monkeypatch the getx method or the x property. So, Python doesn't give a way to hide attributes.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah! That's that name mangling thing I heard about. I didn't realize it was so literal. After doing b._Boo__x = 2 b.x gave me 2. (Also, I didn't think to refer to the thing as x, but your answer made me curious.) –  2rs2ts Jul 4 '13 at 0:20
1  
@2rs2ts: Exactly. The rule of thumb is: Never use double-underscore names unless you want name mangling. And if you don't understand name mangling, you never want it. Once you do understand name mangling, you want it for a few days just for fun, and then never use it again. :) –  abarnert Jul 4 '13 at 0:21
    
In response to your last edit - I think what I wanted was to refer to the attribute as x, and not allow changes to it. I understand now that there's actually two properties here... –  2rs2ts Jul 4 '13 at 0:22
    
It's not possible to "not allow changes to it". Even if you manage to hide the real attribute away somewhere, someone can just replace your x property, or the getx method it relies on. –  abarnert Jul 4 '13 at 0:24
1  
@2rs2ts: Exactly. In your second version, when the class definition finishes, Boo.__dict__['__x'] is the property, so when you try to assign to self.__x in an instance, it tries to call that property's __set__, which raises that error. –  abarnert Jul 4 '13 at 0:28

I use property as decorator. It convenient for calculating data.

May be for make read-only attribute better use magic function as __set__ and __get__?

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't answer the question. –  abarnert Jul 4 '13 at 0:17

Your problem is that using double underscore attribute names mangles the name. So when you are dealing with __x inside of your class definition, outside of the class it actually looks like _Boo__x. That is,

_ + (class name) + (double underscore attribute name)

To demonstrate,

>>> b = Boo(1)
>>> b.__x = 2
>>> b.getx()
1
>>> b.x            # NOTE: same as calling getx
1
>>> b.__x          # why didn't x return 2 if we changed it?
2
>>> b._Boo__x      # because it's actually saved in this attribute
1
>>> b._Boo__x = 3  # setting it here then works
>>> b.x
3
>>> b.getx()
3
share|improve this answer

It's because you don't have a setx function defined.

#!/usr/bin/python

class Boo(object):

        def __init__(self, initialize_x):
                self.x = initialize_x

        def getx(self):
                print
                print '\t\tgetx: returning the value of x', self.__x
                print
                return self.__x

        def setx(self, new_x):
                print
                print '\t\tsetx: setting x to new value',new_x
                print
                self.__x = new_x

        x = property(getx, setx)

print '1  ########'
print
print '\tinitializing Boo object with a default x of 20'
print
o = Boo(20)
print '\treading the value of x through property o.x'
t = o.x
print

print '2  ########'
print
print '\tsetting x\'s value through the property o.x'
o.x = 100
print


print '3  ########'
print
print '\treading the value of x through the property o.x'
t = o.x

When run produces:

1  ########

    initializing Boo object with a default x of 20


        setx: setting x to new value 20

    reading the value of x through property o.x

        getx: returning the value of x 20


2  ########

    setting x's value through the property o.x

        setx: setting x to new value 100


3  ########

    reading the value of x through the property o.x

        getx: returning the value of x 100
share|improve this answer
    
I think a setx defeats the purpose of my having a read-only attribute, but I guess I could have such a function raise an exception to help emphasize the read-only behavior. –  2rs2ts Jul 5 '13 at 16:31
    
Although I understand why not having a setx could affect that assignment style. –  2rs2ts Jul 5 '13 at 16:41

Really just wanted to comment (rather than answer) your question. I think you will find the following informative:

>>> b = Boo(1)
>>> print b.__dict__
{'_Boo__X': 1}
>>> b.__x = 2
>>> print b.__dict__
{'__x': 2, '_Boo__X': 1}

Might provide a hint as to the behavior (which I do not understand sufficiently well to explain).

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