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This might be quite a simple question but anyways: I'm using VS 2010 and what I want is to obtain the result of x****y at the end. This is my code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void main()
{
    int x = 5;
    int *** y= new int**;
    ***y = 5;
    cout << x****y << endl;
    system("pause");
}

This just makes the program crash and I can't figure out why. This is the error log I get:

    1>------ Build started: Project: Stuffing around, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------
    1>  main.cpp
    1>  LINK : D:\Programming Projects\Stuffing around\Debug\Stuffing around.exe not found or not built by the last incremental link; performing full link
    1>  Stuffing around.vcxproj -> D:\Programming Projects\Stuffing around\Debug\Stuffing around.exe
    ========== Build: 1 succeeded, 0 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

Also, would there be a way to achieve the same results without dynamically allocating memory at **y? Thanks a lot.

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1  
You allocated a pointer to a pointer to an integer. But you haven't allocated the integer or the pointer to the integer. –  Barmar Jul 4 '13 at 0:59
3  
If you don't have a C++ book, get one and read the passage on pointers. If you do, well read the passage on pointers. –  Borgleader Jul 4 '13 at 1:02
2  
Would there be a way to achieve the same results without dynamically allocating memory at **y? Yes: int y = 5; –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 4 '13 at 1:02
1  
@antiduh - write real apps. Shortly, pointers make sense. Eventually, ** make sense. Very, very occasionally, *** can be made to make sense. **** should me made to be nonsense. –  Martin James Jul 4 '13 at 1:31
1  
Without any dynamic allocation: std::cout << 25 << '\n'; If you are not going to allocate memory, why use pointers at all? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 4 '13 at 4:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code is dynamically allocating a ptr to ptr to int, but not the nested ptr and int it would need to point to. (hope all the indirection made sense) To do this with dynamic memory your going to need something like this:

    #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;

    void main()
    {
        int x = 5;
        int *** y= new int**;
        *y = new int *
        **y = new int
        ***y = 5;
        cout << x* (***y) << endl;
        system("pause");
    }

To do it without dynamically allocating memory you would need something like this:

    #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;

    void main()
    {
        int x = 5;
        int y = 5;
        int *y_ptr = &y;
        int **y_ptr_ptr = &y_ptr;
        int ***y_ptr_ptr_ptr = &y_ptr_ptr;
        cout << x* (***y_ptr_ptr_ptr) << endl;
        system("pause");
    }
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2  
This is not valid C++. main should always return int. –  Lstor Jul 4 '13 at 3:04

Without any dynamic allocation:

int x = 5;    
int i;
int *pi = &i;
int **ppi = &pi;
int ***y = &ppi;
***y = 5;
cout << x****y << endl;

You can't do it without either dynamic, static, or automatic allocation; a pointer needs something to point to.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the prompt answer! –  Anca Jul 4 '13 at 1:10

Y is not initialized.

y = new int**;
*y = new int*;
**y = new int;
***y = 5;
share|improve this answer
    
This makes sense. Much appreciated :) –  Anca Jul 4 '13 at 1:08

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