Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In CakePHP, it seems like a lot of functions can take their arguments as nested, multidimensional arrays, or as dotted strings:

$this->MyModel->contain(array(
    'Something', 'Something.Else', 'Something.Else.Entirely'
));
$this->MyModel->contain(array(
    'Something' => array(
        'Else' => 'Entirely'
    )
));

Therefore, I figure there must be a function somewhere in the core to switch from dotted to nested associative, but I can't find it for the life of me. Any ideas?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I've actually figured my own way to get this working leveraging the built-in Set functions.

Given:

$input = array (
    'Post.id' => 1,
    'Post.title' => 'Some post title.',
    'Post.Tag.0.id' => 4,
    'Post.Tag.0.name' => 'cakephp',
    'Post.Tag.1.id' => 7,
    'Post.Tag.1.name' => 'mysql',
);

This code will put that into a nested associative array.

$output = array();
foreach ($input as $key => $value) {
    $output = Set::insert($output, $key, $value);
}

Here's the docs for Set::insert()

share|improve this answer

What you're looking for is Set::flatten(). It's not documented in the CakePHP manual, but take a look at the API definition.

It works something like this (the result might not be exact, this is from my head):

$array = array(
    'Post' => array(
        'id' => 1,
        'title' => 'Some post title.',
        'Tag' => array(
            0 => array(
                'id' => 4,
                'name' => 'cakephp',
            ),
            1 => array(
                'id' => 7,
                'name' => 'mysql',
            ),
        ),
    );
);

$array = Set::flatten($array);
var_dump($array);

Your $array variable will now look like this:

Array (
    'Post.id' => 1,
    'Post.title' => 'Some post title.',
    'Post.Tag.0.id' => 4,
    'Post.Tag.0.name' => 'cakephp',
    'Post.Tag.1.id' => 7,
    'Post.Tag.1.name' => 'mysql',
)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Matt, unfortunately I actually need the exact opposite of this. –  nickf Nov 17 '09 at 6:24
    
Ahh, sorry. I misread the question. –  Matt Huggins Nov 17 '09 at 7:39
1  
I'm glad you misready the question ;-) That was a nice feature I've been looking for! –  the0ther Mar 21 '11 at 3:37

It's just a convention throughout Cake, but each part does its own, customized parsing. If you look at the function ContainableBehavior::containments() in cake/libs/model/behaviors/containable.php, you'll see a lot of preg_matching and explode('.')ing going on. At least in the case of Containable, the verbose array('name' => array(...)) syntax seems to be the canonical syntax, but it can be abbreviated with the dot syntax, which will just be expanded. I'd guess that the expanding itself is just too varied among different parts to be easily summarized in a central function.

That, or they just haven't gotten to it yet. :)

share|improve this answer
    
deceze, I find myself reading the CakePHP posts on SO just so I can find out something new. Happens every time you post. Thanks for the addt'l info, keep up the great work! –  Travis Leleu Nov 17 '09 at 2:48
    
I'm actually learning a lot from the questions as well, it's a mutually beneficial relationship. :-3 –  deceze Nov 17 '09 at 2:57

Great question, I was just searching for the same thing. Apparently it's coming in Cake 2.2.

The new Hash class (a new, improved version of the Set class) has an expand() function which does this. You can view the code on Github if you need to use it in the meantime:

https://github.com/cakephp/cakephp/blob/2.2/lib/Cake/Utility/Hash.php

...However the solution nickf posted works great, too. :-)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.