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I am using Python2.7.5 in Windows 7. I'm new to command line arguments. I am trying to do this exercise:

Write a program that reads in a string on the command line and returns a table of the letters which occur in the string with the number of times each letter occurs. For example:

$ python letter_counts.py "ThiS is String with Upper and lower case Letters."
a  2
c  1
d  1
# etc.

I know how to add command line arguments to a file name and output them in a list in cmd (windows command prompt). However, I would like to learn how to work with command line arguments in python script- because I need to add/access the additional command line arguments and create a loop in order to count their letters.

Outside of cmd, I currently only have letter_counts.py as the filename- that's only one command line argument.

In python not cmd : how do I add and access command line arguments?

share|improve this question

You want to use the sys.argv list from the sys module. It lets you access arguments passed in the command line.

For example, if your command line input was python myfile.py a b c, sys.argv[0] is myfile.py, sys.argv[1] is a, sys.argv[2] is b, and sys.argv[3] is c.

A running example (testcode.py):

if __name__ == "__main__":
    import sys
    print sys.argv

Then, running (in the command line):

D:\some_path>python testcode.py a b c
['testcode.py', 'a', 'b', 'c']
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I am trying to follow your advice. If simply entered in the python shell, sys.argv returns an empty list. If I write it in a .py file and the press "run module", it returns a list with 1 argument- the filename of the .py file. I have successfully added command line arguments to the very same file in cmd (returning a list) But sys.argv only responds to the name of the .py file- and continues to return a list of length one. – user2547317 Jul 4 '13 at 3:13
    
@user2547317 sys.argv will only have more than one element if you use command line to run the program, such as python myfile.py a b c. – Rushy Panchal Jul 4 '13 at 3:18
    
I am entering python myfile.py a b c in cmd- should I be entering it elsewhere? – user2547317 Jul 4 '13 at 3:27
    
@user2547317 No, that is correct. I'm not exactly sure what you meant in your first comment. – Rushy Panchal Jul 4 '13 at 3:42

You can do something along these lines:

#!/usr/bin/python

import sys

print sys.argv
counts={}
for st in sys.argv[1:]:
    for c in st:
        counts.setdefault(c.lower(),0)
        counts[c.lower()]+=1

for k,v in sorted(counts.items(), key=lambda t: t[1], reverse=True):
   print "'{}' {}".format(k,v)

When invoked with python letter_counts.py "ThiS is String with Upper and lower case Letters." prints:

['./letter_counts.py', 'ThiS is String with Upper and lower case Letters.']
' ' 8
'e' 5
's' 5
't' 5
'i' 4
'r' 4
'a' 2
'h' 2
'l' 2
'n' 2
'p' 2
'w' 2
'c' 1
'd' 1
'g' 1
'o' 1
'u' 1
'.' 1

If you instead do not use quotes, like this: python letter_counts.py ThiS is String with Upper and lower case Letters. it prints:

['./letter_counts.py', 'ThiS', 'is', 'String', 'with', 'Upper', 'and', 'lower', 'case', 'Letters.']
'e' 5
's' 5
't' 5
'i' 4
'r' 4
'a' 2
'h' 2
'l' 2
'n' 2
'p' 2
'w' 2
'c' 1
'd' 1
'g' 1
'o' 1
'u' 1
'.' 1

Note the difference in the list sys.argv at the top of the output. The result is that whitespace between words is lost and the letter counts are the same.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @drewk Thank you for your response. I've gotten this to work by having the code in the letter_counts.py file. Then I open cmd and invoke python letter_counts.py "ThiS is String with Upper and lower case Letters." Once I do that, in the cmd window, I see the output. Is that the right process? I can only executed command line arguments in the cmd window? – user2547317 Jul 4 '13 at 18:35
    
Yes, only the cmd window but you could invoke from another process and capture this output. What do you mean of 'Python' vs 'cmd'? – dawg Jul 4 '13 at 18:53
    
Got it..I meant Python shell vs command line prompt (cmd) window in Windows 7 – user2547317 Jul 4 '13 at 19:15
    
I do not understand your question I am afraid. – dawg Jul 4 '13 at 21:02

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