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From the example and the comment on Clojuredoc for function every?

user> (every? true? '())    ;empty is true? 
true

user> (every? false? '())    ;empty is false? 
true

This is indeed weird and possibly illogical, as I would expect false for both above. Could somebody shed some light on rationale behind this?

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2  
It's perfectly logical: (not (every? pred coll)) should be true precisely when you can find an element of coll for which pred returns false. Good luck find such an element in an empty collection. –  Omar Antolín-Camarena Jul 4 '13 at 5:21
1  
You can also think of it as (reduce && true (map pred '())). –  Jon Purdy Jul 4 '13 at 6:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 34 down vote accepted

In mathematics, particularly in the field of predicate logic, it is accepted that every universal predicate about the empty set is true. For example, the following statement is true:

Every integer in the empty set is even.

Similarly, the following statement is also true:

Every integer in the empty set is odd.

Therefore, the following bizarre statement is also true:

Every integer in the empty set is simultaneously even and odd.

Think about it: can you give a counter-example to any of the above?

A more formal explanation would be the following. When you have a universal predicate, which can be formally written as ∀x∈XP(x) (for all x element of X, P(x)), it is equivalent to an implication of the form x∈X ⇒ P(x) (x element of X implies P(x)). Since the left-hand side of this implication is false for the empty set (ie, there are no elements x such that x∈Ø, which is simply the definition of the empty set), the implication is true (ie, false ⇒ whatever evaluates to true; check the truth table here).

This is exactly what you are seeing in the code you've shown: Clojure is evaluating the universal predicate (every? pred) on the empty list '() as true, which is correct and perfectly logical according to predicate logic.

Finally, you can expect to see the exact same behavior on every functional language or functional library, with the synonyms all, forall and maybe others. If you explore the implementation of these functions, you will notice a common pattern: the function will return true unless it finds a counter-example, ie, an element for which the predicate is false; if it doesn't find such an element (which includes not finding any element at all -- the empty set) then it cannot prove the predicate to be false, and returns true. This is done either with loops or folds, depending on the language or framework, but the idea is always the same.

For example, check:

(they all do exactly the same thing as (every? pred coll) in Clojure; and feel free to edit and add your favorite language or library!).

For more information, be sure to read Wikipedia's articles on Universal Quantification and Vacuous truth.

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3  
Excellent answer! –  andrewdotnich Jul 4 '13 at 5:08
1  
Thanks for the info!! From summary part of Wikipedia Vacuous_truth I also find a mental workaround "There seems to be no direct reason to pick true; it’s just that things blow up in our face if we don’t". –  Kevin Zhu Jul 5 '13 at 6:07

We have 3 possible situations, only one at a time is applicable to a collection.

  • The collections has items and they all pas the predicate - True
  • One of the item in the coll failed the predicate - False
  • The coll is empty - ??

Now if you think about returning false for empty list, it would also feel weird because false is returned when at least one item in the coll failed the predicate but for empty list that didn't happened.

I think the rational to choose true for empty coll was based on the fact that the number of cases where this is applicable in real world were more as compared to where it would not make sense. For example: Someone gave me a list of URLs and I need to return their downloaded content, now my function first want to verify that each URL is in proper format and then use map or pmap to download the URLs -

(if (every? url? urls) (map download urls) (throw "Invalid url found"))

This and more examples of this kind will make working with sequences more seamless.

On the other hand I am a statically typed language guy (like Haskell) and would prefer to use types to solve this problem. Rather than returning a true or false I would want this function to return Maybe bool such that:

  • Every item in the coll pass the predicate - Just True
  • One of the item in the coll failed the predicate - Just False
  • The coll is empty - Nothing
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1  
The first of your situations includes the last one. Maybe you wanted the first one to be "the collections has items and they all pas the predicate"? –  Omar Antolín-Camarena Jul 4 '13 at 5:19
    
Updated........ –  Ankur Jul 4 '13 at 5:46
    
Thanks for the solutions, I agree possibly in real world we may need to define a third type like Nothing here. From summary part of Wikipedia Vacuous_truth I read "There seems to be no direct reason to pick true; it’s just that things blow up in our face if we don’t". –  Kevin Zhu Jul 5 '13 at 5:58

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