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I am new to Ruby.

What is the difference between || and ||=?

>> a = 6 || 4
=> 6
>> a ||= 6
=> 6

Sounds like they are the same.

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marked as duplicate by Ed S., Darshan-Josiah Barber, the Tin Man, Stefan, squiguy Jul 4 '13 at 6:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
not from Ruby, but ||= may be similar as += –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 4 '13 at 4:11
2  
||= is very different from +=. –  the Tin Man Jul 4 '13 at 4:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

||= will set the left-hand value to the right hand value only if the left-hand value is falsey.

In this case, both 6 and 4 are truthy, so a = 6 || 4 will set a to the first truthy value, which is 6.

a ||= 6 will set a to 6 only if a is falsey. That is, if it's nil or false.

a = nil
a ||= 6
a ||= 4
a # => 6
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1  
sounds like undefined also include. based on the above answer? –  Kit Ho Jul 4 '13 at 4:20
    
Yes, you can use ||= to define variables that were previously undefined. –  Chris Heald Jul 4 '13 at 4:21
    
@KitHo yes I did include that.. :) –  Arup Rakshit Jul 4 '13 at 4:21

x ||= y means assigning y to x if x is null or undefined or false ; it is a shortcut to x = y unless x.

With Ruby short-circuit operator || the right operand is not evaluated if the left operand is truthy.

Now some quick examples on my above lines on ||= :

when x is undefined and n is nil:

with unless

y = 2
x = y unless x
x # => 2

n = nil
m = 2
n = m unless n
m # => 2

with =||

y = 2
x ||= y
x # => 2

n = nil
m = 2
n ||= m
m # => 2
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a ||= 6 only assigns 6 if it wasn't already assigned. ( actually, falsey, as Chris said)

a = 4
a ||= 6
=> 4

a = 4 || 6
=> 4
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You can expand a ||= 6 as

a || a = 6

So you can see that it use a if a is not nil or false, otherwise it will assign value to a and return that value. This is commonly used for memoization of values.

Update

Thanks to the first comment for pointing out the true expansion of the ||= (or equal) operator. I learned something new and found this interesting post that talks about it. http://dablog.rubypal.com/2008/3/25/a-short-circuit-edge-case

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1  
This is wrong. It (admittedly unintuitively) expands to a || a = 6 –  Ed S. Jul 4 '13 at 4:36
    
I must admit I never thought of that expansion. @EdS. Do you have a source or a way I can check that? I updated my answer with it because it does make sense. –  Leo Correa Jul 5 '13 at 16:59
    
Check one of the two duplicate topics. I have to admit, I thought the same as you a couple of years ago and answered the same question, but I was corrected by a more knowledgeable SO member. EDIT: Oops, I see you found it. –  Ed S. Jul 5 '13 at 20:07

Both expressions a = 6 || 4 and a ||= 6 return the same result but the difference is that ||= assigns value to variable if this variable is nil or false.

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|| operator returns the first truthy expression of given 2

so

a = 6 || 4 will assign value 6 to a while a = nil || 4 will assign 4 to a

the ||= is shorthand for || with assignment

which means a||= 6 -----> a = a || 6 so if a is false or nil, value 6 will be assigned to a other wise the value of a is retained.

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