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I have tens of thousands of simulations to run on a system with several cores. Currently, it is done in serial, where I know my input parameters, and store my results in a dict.

Serial version

import time
import random

class MyModel(object):
    input = None
    output = None

    def run(self):
        time.sleep(random.random())  # simulate a complex task
        self.output = self.input * 10


# Run serial tasks and store results for each parameter

parameters = range(10)
results = {}

for p in parameters:
    m = MyModel()
    m.input = p
    m.run()
    results[p] = m.output

print('results: ' + str(results))

Which takes <10 seconds, and displays correct results:

results: {0: 0, 1: 10, 2: 20, 3: 30, 4: 40, 5: 50, 6: 60, 7: 70, 8: 80, 9: 90}

Parallel version

My attempts to parallelize this procedure are based on the example in the multiprocessing module near the text "An example showing how to use queues to feed tasks to a collection of worker processes and collect the results" (sorry, no URL anchor available).

The following builds on the top half of the serial version:

from multiprocessing import Process, Queue
NUMBER_OF_PROCESSES = 4

def worker(input, output):
    for args in iter(input.get, 'STOP'):
        m = MyModel()
        m.input = args[0]
        m.run()
        output.put(m.output)


# Run parallel tasks and store results for each parameter

parameters = range(10)
results = {}

# Create queues
task_queue = Queue()
done_queue = Queue()

# Submit tasks
tasks = [(t,) for t in parameters]
for task in tasks:
    task_queue.put(task)

# Start worker processes
for i in range(NUMBER_OF_PROCESSES):
    Process(target=worker, args=(task_queue, done_queue)).start()

# Get unordered results
for i in range(len(tasks)):
    results[i] = done_queue.get()

# Tell child processes to stop
for i in range(NUMBER_OF_PROCESSES):
    task_queue.put('STOP')

print('results: ' + str(results))

Takes only a few seconds now, but the mapping orders between inputs and results are mixed up.

results: {0: 10, 1: 0, 2: 60, 3: 40, 4: 20, 5: 80, 6: 30, 7: 90, 8: 70, 9: 50}

I realise that I'm populating the results based on an unordered done_queue.get(), but I'm not sure how to get the correct mapping to task_queue. Any ideas? Any other way to make this somehow cleaner?

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1 Answer

A-ha! The worker needs to embed some kind of ID, such as the input parameter(s) used to return to the output queue, which can be used to identify the returned process. Here are the required modifications:

def worker(input, output):
    for args in iter(input.get, 'STOP'):
        m = MyModel()
        m.input = args[0]
        m.run()
        # Return a tuple of an ID (the input parameter), and the model output
        return_obj = (m.input, m.output)
        output.put(return_obj)

and

# Get unordered results
for i in range(len(tasks)):
    # Unravel output tuple, which has the input parameter 'p' used as an ID
    p, result = done_queue.get()
    results[p] = result
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