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Is there an or operator in C#?

I want to do:

if (ActionsLogWriter.Close or ErrorDumpWriter.Close == true)
{
    // Do stuff here
}

But I'm not sure how I could do something like that.

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To be clear, "or" is an operator and not a statement. –  JoshJordan Nov 17 '09 at 3:00
20  
@lndebi: Your questions reveal a strikingly uneven grasp of C#. Consider walking through some tutorials to balance yourself out before tacking package managers and whatever else you're working on. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… is a place to start. –  Michael Petrotta Nov 17 '09 at 3:01
2  
Sure, you could just go read a language tutorial to figure out what the logical or operator is, but why do that when you can just use three "nots" and an "and"? Sheesh! Kids these days want everything handed handed to them on a damn silver platter! –  D__ Nov 17 '09 at 4:18
2  
Yeah, i'm kinda self-taught with this stuff and eventually I will take a class, but I like learning as I go more than learning all at once using a book or written text because I can't ask a piece of paper why something isn't working or why it works that way. That is way I'm asking a lot of questions of StackOverflow –  Display Name Nov 17 '09 at 5:29
1  
I'm self taught also. I can use the or operator all day in Python. Now I'm reading some C# code and seeing this || everywhere and I don't know what to ask. Thanks to he who asked the question and BIG thanks to those that just give an answer and move on. –  Justin Feb 24 '12 at 20:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 48 down vote accepted

C# supports two boolean or operators: the single bar | and the double-bar ||.

The difference is that | always checks both the left and right conditions, while || only checks the right-side condition if it's necessary (if the left side evaluates to false).

This is significant when the condition on the right-side involves processing or results in side effects. (For example, if your ErrorDumpWriter.Close method took a while to complete or changed something's state.)

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Should that read: || only checks the right-side condition if the left side evaluates to false? Since TRUE OR ANYTHING is always TRUE? –  ParmesanCodice Nov 17 '09 at 8:21
    
Just a minor thing - there are ofcourse more boolean operators than that, maybe rephrase to "two boolean/logic OR operators". –  sharkin Nov 17 '09 at 11:39
    
Allright, I'm up to -2 for typing while sleepy. :) –  Jeff Sternal Nov 17 '09 at 11:42
3  
Be careful: || is a logical operator and | is a binary operator –  Matthieu Nov 17 '09 at 11:42
5  
@Matthieu: No, if the operands are boolean, the |-operator is a logical operator. It's only treated as binary if operands are integral. –  sharkin Nov 17 '09 at 11:47

Also worth mentioning, in C# the OR operator is short-circuiting. In your example, Close seems to be a property, but if it were a method, it's worth noting that:

if (ActionsLogWriter.Close() || ErrorDumpWriter.Close())

is fundamentally different from

if (ErrorDumpWriter.Close() || ActionsLogWriter.Close())

In C#, if the first expression returns true, the second expression will not be evaluated at all. Just be aware of this. It actually works to your advantage most of the time.

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1  
Does it matter if it's a property or method? In this context I would guess the property-code is called just as well as for methods. –  sharkin Nov 17 '09 at 11:50
    
That is a good point. If the properties had side effects (which is also very bad design) the same caveat applies. –  Josh Nov 17 '09 at 19:36
if (ActionsLogWriter.Close || ErrorDumpWriter.Close == true)
{    // Do stuff here
}
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just like in C and C++, the boolean or operator is ||

if (ActionsLogWriter.Close || ErrorDumpWriter.Close == true)
{
    // Do stuff here
}
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Or is || in C#.

You may have a look at this.

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The single " | " operator will evaluate both sides of the expression.

    if (ActionsLogWriter.Close | ErrorDumpWriter.Close == true)
{
    // Do stuff here
}

The double operator " || " will only evaluate the left side if the expression returns true.

    if (ActionsLogWriter.Close || ErrorDumpWriter.Close == true)
{
    // Do stuff here
}

C# has many similarities to C++ but their still are differences between the two languages ;)

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