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I am comparing two list by following way

        var listOne = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5};
        var listTwo = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5,7};
        bool isEqual = false;

        foreach (var item in listOne)
        {
                if(listTwo.Contains(item))
                {
                    isEqual = true;
                }
                else
                {
                    isEqual = false;
                    break;
                }
        }

        if(listOne.Count == listTwo.Count && isEqual == true)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Equal list");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Not Equal list");
        }

Is there any easy way to do this??? I need it for refactoring purpose. Thanks

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4  
if (listOne.Except(listTwo).Any()) LINQ - compare two lists :) –  Paritosh Jul 4 '13 at 7:39
2  
Do you care about the order of the items? like, does {1,2} = {2,1} for your matter? –  Roee Gavirel Jul 4 '13 at 7:41
1  
{1,2} = {2,1} does not matter @RoeeGavirel –  user2548991 Jul 4 '13 at 8:01
1  
@IITDU: But your accepted answer does not ignore the order. So it's different to your code. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 4 '13 at 8:06
1  
Actually I was not sure the order matter or does not matter. Any way .. I Edited it. –  Atish Dipongkor Jul 4 '13 at 8:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

very easy way

    var listOne = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5};
    var listTwo = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5,7};

    if (listOne.SequenceEqual(listTwo))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Equal list");
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Not Equal list");
            }

if order does not matter then the solution will be

    var listOne = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5};
    var listTwo = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5,7};

     if (listOne.OrderBy(m => m).SequenceEqual(listTwo.OrderBy(m => m)))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Equal list");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Not Equal list");
        }
share|improve this answer
1  
He hasn't mentioned that he wants to know if both have the same order of items. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 4 '13 at 7:45
2  
This is not correct!! {1, 2} and {2, 1} should return true. –  Ahmed KRAIEM Jul 4 '13 at 7:45
1  
@AhmedKRAIEM - OP didn't specify that directly, but his code would suggest that, yes. –  Corak Jul 4 '13 at 7:56
    
@Corak: Actually OP has specified that directly, in a comment to his question. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 4 '13 at 8:09
    
Actually I was not sure the order matter or does not matter. Any way .. I Edited it. –  Atish Dipongkor Jul 4 '13 at 8:18

If you are not interested in the same order you can use Except which is very efficient:

bool isEqual = !listOne.Except(listTwo).Any();

If you want to know if both contain the same items(still ignoring the order):

if (listOne.Count > listTwo.Count)
    isEqual = !listOne.Except(listTwo).Any();
else
    isEqual = !listTwo.Except(listOne).Any();

If you want to check if both lists contain the same items in the same order:

bool isEqual = listOne.SequenceEqual(listTwo);

If you are using custom types you need to override Equals and GetHashCode, otherwise you just compare by reference.

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3  
+1 seems this is a cleaner option –  now he who must not be named. Jul 4 '13 at 7:42

I believe the easiest way is to use Enumerable.SequenceEqual method.

Determines whether two sequences are equal by comparing the elements by using the default equality comparer for their type.

bool equal = listOne.SequenceEqual(listTwo);

The SequenceEqual<TSource>(IEnumerable<TSource>, IEnumerable<TSource>) method enumerates the two source sequences in parallel and compares corresponding elements by using the default equality comparer for TSource, Default. The default equality comparer, Default, is used to compare values of the types that implement the IEqualityComparer<T> generic interface.

As Tim pointed, if your items are not ordered, using Except method looks better. For example;

bool equal = !listTwo.Except(listOne).Any();
share|improve this answer
    
But he doesn't want to know if the order of items is also the same, at least his old code doesn't check that. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 4 '13 at 7:55
    
@TimSchmelter Thanks Tim, updated. –  Soner Gönül Jul 4 '13 at 8:00

If Order of item in the list matter you can use the SequenceEqual as many advise here.

If the order doesn't matter you should sort the lists before, and I would check the count of them before the sorting to avoid sorting and comparing if there are in different size:

var listOne = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5};
var listTwo = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5,7};

var equal = (listOne.Count == listTwo.Count);

if (equal)
{
    listOne.Sort();
    listTwo.Sort();
    equal = listOne.SequenceEqual(listTwo)
}

if (equal)
{
     Console.WriteLine("Equal list");
}
else
{
     Console.WriteLine("Not Equal list");
}
share|improve this answer

Assuming you are not interested in the order, you can use OrderBy and SequenceEqual:

public static bool ListsEquals(List<int> listOne, List<int> listTwo)
{
    if (listOne.Count != listTwo.Count)
        return false;

    if (!listOne.OrderBy(x => x).SequenceEqual(listTwo.OrderBy(x => x)))
        return false;
}

Or Intersect:

public static bool ListsEquals(List<int> listOne, List<int> listTwo)
{
    if (listOne.Count != listTwo.Count)
        return false;

    if (listOne.Intersect(listTwo).Count() != listOne.Count)
        return false;

    return true;
}

Or Except and Any

public static bool ListsEquals(List<int> listOne, List<int> listTwo)
{
    if (listOne.Count != listTwo.Count)
        return false;

    if (!listOne.Except(listTwo).Any())
        return false;

    return true;
}
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