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I know there are so many post related to this question, but none of them were able to clarify my doubt.

I need to save the DateTime value from user in global constant(UTC) millisecond value, so that it will be helpful in converting to different timezone, for that i made some test with two different timezone, following is what i tried:

With TimeZone - PDT (GMT - 7)

DateTime dateTime = new DateTime(2013, 07, 04, 1, 19, 22);
String format = "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss Z";

int offsetMinutes = (dateTime.getZone().getOffset(dateTime)/1000)/60;

log.info(" Current Timezone => "+dateTime.getZone()+", OffSet => "+offsetMinutes);
log.info(" dateTime => "+dateTime.toString(format)+" => "+dateTime.getMillis());

And With Same DateTime in UTC

DateTime utcDateTime = dateTime.withZone(DateTimeZone.UTC);
offsetMinutes = (utcDateTime.getZone().getOffset(utcDateTime)/1000)/60;

log.info(" Current Timezone => "+utcDateTime.getZone()+", OffSet "+offsetMinutes);
log.info(" dateTime => "+utcDateTime.toString(format)+" => "+utcDateTime.getMillis());

following is the result i got :

IN PDT (GMT - 7)

Current Timezone => America/Los_Angeles, OffSet => -420 (-7)
dateTime => 2013-07-04 01:19:22 -0700 => 1372925962000
Current Timezone => UTC, OffSet 0
dateTime => 2013-07-04 08:19:22 +0000 => 1372925962000

In GMT +5:30

Current Timezone => Asia/Kolkata, OffSet => 330 (+5:30)
dateTime => 2013-07-04 01:19:22 +0530 => 1372880962000
Current Timezone => UTC, OffSet 0
dateTime => 2013-07-03 19:49:22 +0000 => 1372880962000

and the issue is,

  1. With PDT Timezone, why local milliseconds and UTC milliseconds are same ? (same as with IST timezone)

  2. Why the UTC value from Two Different TimeZone are different ?

if utc is supposed to be global constant, the value should be same for two different timezone right ?

can somebody clarify my doubt, am i doing it wrong ?

Please any suggestion or clarification would be really helpful

Thanks Ramesh

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2  
Sorry, this is unclear; the output seems perfectly logical for me... –  fge Jul 4 '13 at 8:28
    
it is perfect, but i just had a doubt on it –  Ramesh Jul 4 '13 at 9:25
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I need to save the DateTime value from user in global constant(UTC) millisecond value

Then all you need to do is call getMillis() on a DateTime constructed with the right local date/time and time zone. You don't need to use withZone at all. Note that some local date/time/zone combinations can be ambiguous or skipped, due to time zone transitions. You should think about what you want to do in those situations.

With PDT Timezone, why local milliseconds and UTC milliseconds are same

Because you're calling getMillis(), which is the number of milliseconds since the unix epoch. It's a global representation of an instant in time, regardless of time zone.

Why the UTC value from Two Different TimeZone are different ?

You've kept the local time the same, but changed the time zone - which means you're referring to a different instant in time.

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yes getMillis() is what i will be saving to db. but i got confused with the out comes from two different timezone. your answers cleared it. thanks for your time. –  Ramesh Jul 4 '13 at 9:17
    
You've kept the local time the same, but changed the time zone - which means you're referring to a different instant in time. can u give me some more clarification for this, like UTC represents instant in time, then, 2013-07-04 01:19:22 -0700 => 2013-07-04 08:19:22 +0000 2013-07-04 01:19:22 +0530 => 2013-07-03 19:49:22 +0000 both are same datetime only right , why the utc value is different ? –  Ramesh Jul 4 '13 at 9:22
    
you said i changed the timezone, actually its not, what i meant is i changed the timezone to utc(which is with no timezone), so am pointing to utc date when calculating the milliseconds, this is what i can't understand –  Ramesh Jul 4 '13 at 9:28
2  
@Ramesh: I meant that you changed the time zone from America/Los_Angeles to Asia/Kolkata. You've got the same local time in both cases, but they're in different time zones, which means they're different instants in time. –  Jon Skeet Jul 4 '13 at 9:30
    
Oh yes yes, thank you, now i got, what i should have done is when changing the timezone, instead of using the same value new DateTime(2013, 07, 04, 1, 19, 22);, i should have used the corresponding value for this in the new timezone, that would have made sense. Thanks you! –  Ramesh Jul 4 '13 at 9:33
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I need to save the DateTime value from user in global constant(UTC) millisecond value, so that it will be helpful in converting to different timezone

And how do you store that exactly?

As the output of your test code clearly demonstrates, it Just Works(tm). A Unix epoch is a representation of an instant in time starting from Jan 1, 1970 GMT (normally in seconds, but Java output milliseconds instead). You can use that to convert to any time zone.

But your best option is still to store both the date as the user entered it and the timezone. This way you'll be able to make any calculation you want.

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yes i will be storing utc long in db –  Ramesh Jul 4 '13 at 9:18
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