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how to find the middle of the linked list when we are not informed of its size and it must be performed using only one loop and only one pointer.

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1  
Is that the whole question? Are you allowed to use recursion? –  rlbond Nov 17 '09 at 4:36
1  
Is this a singly-linked or doubly-linked list? –  paxdiablo Nov 17 '09 at 4:36
6  
how to find the answer to my homework question using only one internet connection and only one stackoverflow website... –  Keith Randall Nov 17 '09 at 4:37
1  
its a singly linked list.. –  prateek Nov 17 '09 at 4:44
2  
Are you allowed to destroy the list in the process? –  Thilo Nov 17 '09 at 4:53

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

How about

LinkedList * llist = getLList(); // the linked list
Node * node = llist.head;

while ( node ) {
    node = node.next;
    if ( node ) {
        node  = node.next;
        llist.remove( llist.head );
    }
}
// now llist.head is (er, um... was) the middle node.  
// hope you didn't need the rest of the list.
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2  
Haha! That is awesome! –  rlbond Nov 17 '09 at 4:51
    
But you are using two pointers. Definitely "e" and definitely "head". wrang-wrang's solution seems to me just the same... I think there is no answer to this question. You just can't handle the L1 list with one pointer (because when you move it, you loose your head (well... list head)) –  SadSido Nov 17 '09 at 8:52
3  
@SadSido: Obviously, if I have a linked list, I have a bunch of pointers, including the head. I assumed that the question meant one pointer, in addition to those already in the the list. –  Paul Hanbury Nov 17 '09 at 13:06
2  
@SadSido: Yes, I do realize that I am destroying the list in the process. However, since the requirements were so unnatural, I didn't think the solution needed to be extra-resilient. –  Paul Hanbury Nov 17 '09 at 13:11
Node *m,*e,*head; /* head is given */
m=e=head;
while(e) {
  e=e->next;
  if (e) {
    e=e->next;
    m=m->next;
  }
}
/* now m is the middle node */

Sorry, I had to use 2 pointers :)


Adding this to your answer, because a minor tweak reduces the number of pointers to 1. I hope you don't mind:

Node m,*e,*head; /* head is given */
e = head;
if (e) m = *e;
while(e) {
  e = e->next;
  if (e) {
    e = e->next;
    m = *(m.next);
  }
}
/* now m is the middle node */
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3  
Well, it's not challenging at all when you cheat. –  rlbond Nov 17 '09 at 4:39
1  
@rlbond: It is still very clever, though. –  Thilo Nov 17 '09 at 4:45
    
@rlbond: if you think of a better solution, propose it instead of grumbling, it seems to me the most logical solution. Though obviously the middle node in case of an even number of nodes is quite debatable. –  Matthieu M. Nov 17 '09 at 13:53
    
@Matthieu, but the problem was explicitly posed as requiring that it "must be performed using only one loop and only one pointer." It's nice and clean, but not a solution for the problem as posed in the question. –  Suppressingfire Nov 17 '09 at 15:39
    
I'm happy to have Mike's code stay, but I have to point out that the Node m contains a pointer (m.next), so it's a technicality :) –  Jonathan Graehl Dec 3 '09 at 12:53

Well, it's sort of a hack, since it's functionally equivalent to 2 loops. But still, it is only 1 loop.

Node* middle(Node* const begin)
{
    Node* current = begin;
    bool size_known = false;
    int size = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        if (!size_known)
        {
            if (current)
            {
                ++size;
                current = current->next;
            }
            else
            {
                current = begin;
                size_known = true;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if (size <= 1)
                return current;
            current = current->next;
            size -= 2;
        }
    }
}
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How is using an extra bool and an extra int different from using an extra pointer? –  Thilo Nov 17 '09 at 4:48

see my code. it works on my FC9 x86_64 correctly, the function "middle()" is that what you want:

static struct node *middle(struct node *head)
{
        struct node *mid = head;
        int flag = 0;
        while (NULL != head) {
                head = head->next;
                flag = !flag;
                if (flag) {
                        mid = mid->next;
                }
        }
        return mid;
}

EDIT: remove code except the middle().

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3  
You're also using 2 pointers (you're modifying head). –  rlbond Nov 17 '09 at 4:57
1  
Yes, this is essentially the same as wrang-wrang's solution. –  Thilo Nov 17 '09 at 5:01

We can use skip list in this case:

1) While traversing each node in the Linked List make a skip list of the odd numbered nodes. Time: O(n) Space: O(n/2)

2) Now when you reach the end of the list divide the legnth by 2 and add 1 to get the middle element index.

3) Search for the index in the skip list O(logn) time.

So, Overall Time Complexity of the algorithm would be :

O(n)(1 traversal) + O(logn)(Searching Skip list) = O(n) Space Complexity : O(n/2)

Please reply if this is inefficient....

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Iterate over your list using the provided head pointer and increment your one allowed pointer (I assume from your ambiguously-worded question that you're allowed one pointer besides the one that was passed in) once for every two increments of the head pointer.

Node* middle( Node* head )
{
    Node* middle = head;
    while (head != NULL) {
        head = head->next;

        if (head->next != NULL) {
            head = head->next;
            middle = middle->next;
        }
    }
    return middle;
}

There are edge cases ignored here (like what's the middle of a list with an even number of elements).

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I had a similar question at IBM ISL Pune. Q:"How to find middle node of a singly linked list". I answered A:"Take two pointers start at head and move one pointer in single step and another pointer in two steps". Interviewer said, that's most simple solution. Q:Tell me how will you traverse without using 2 pointers. Hint is "use compiler property."

Does anyone know how to find middle node using compiler property?

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