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I have an existing javascript function:

function changeColor(ID){

    try{
        initialize();
    }
    finally{
        changeDesign(ID);
    }

}

I want to do something like this:

for(var x=0; x<2; x++){
        document.getElementById(x).onclick = "changeColor(" + x +")";
}

The output with the html should be:

<tr bgcolor="#FFFFFF" id="0" onclick="changeColor(0)>
share|improve this question
    
ids should not begin with a digit. –  Teemu Jul 4 '13 at 9:16
    
@JonathanNaguin Its not working...If I click the tr...nothing is happening... –  pmark019 Jul 4 '13 at 9:21
    
@FelixKling I also tried 'document.getElementById(x).onclick = changeColor(x);' but when I run the application, it performs the function...what I want is for the user to first click the tr before the function is performed. –  pmark019 Jul 4 '13 at 9:23
    
Is that so surprising? changeColor(x) calls the function changeColor and then the return value will be assigned to .onclick. If I do var foo = bar(42);, then bar will be executed and the return value will be assigned to foo. That's how function calling works (but now worries, people seem to get confused when it's about event handlers ;)). –  Felix Kling Jul 4 '13 at 9:24
    
@pmark019: See the answer by Felix Kling. You must not include (0) because then you say: "Run the function and set the return value as onclick event". –  awe Jul 4 '13 at 9:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assigning an event handler via the DOM API does not modify the actual HTML (in fact, the HTML source that the browser receives is readonly).

You have to assign a function to .onclick, not a string:

for(var x=0; x<2; x++){
    document.getElementById(x).onclick = changeColor;
}

where changeColor is defined as

function changeColor(){
    var ID = this.id; // `this` refers to element the handler is bound to

    try{
        initialize();
    }
    finally{
        changeDesign(ID);
    }

}

I recommend to read the excellent articles about event handling on quirksmode.org.

share|improve this answer
    
Alternatively you can provide input parameter by wrapping in inline function like this: document.getElementById(x).onclick = function(){changeColor(x)};. This is useful if you need input parameters that is not accessible as properties on the element, only at the time of event binding. –  awe Jul 4 '13 at 9:33
    
Right, in this case you would have to use an IIFE though, to capture the value of the variable x: (function(x) { document.getElementById(x).onclick = function(){changeColor(x)}; }(x));. –  Felix Kling Jul 4 '13 at 9:43

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