Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've ran into a known issue with chrome not being precise for setInterval() calls. Consider the following code (jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/periklis/j6AU8/), which displays a simple timer:

<span id = "time_left"></span>
<script>
    seconds = 0;
    minutes = 10;
    hours = 0;

    setInterval(function () {
        if (seconds >= 1) {seconds--;}
        else {
            if (seconds == 0 ) {seconds = 59;}
            if (minutes >= 1)  {minutes--;}
            else {
                if (minutes == 0) {minutes = 59;}
                if (hours >= 1)   {hours--;}
                else              {hours = 0;}
            }
        }
        min = minutes.toString();
        sec = seconds.toString()
        if (min.length == 1) {min = "0" + min;}
        if (sec.length == 1) {sec = "0" + sec;}

        document.getElementById("time_left").innerHTML = hours + ":" + min + ":" + sec;

    }, 1000);
</script>

Using chromium (28.0.1500.52), I've opened the same script in 2 tabs, one having the focus and one hidden. After a while, if I switch to the hidden one, the timer has lagged behind for several seconds. The same holds true if the period is larger than 1'', say 2 or 3.

According to the link provided above, chrome should only exhibit similar behavior for calls less than 1''. Is there any (pure js, not jquery), work around this issue?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This timer doesn't lag, because it checks the 'real' time using the Date object.

var endTime = new Date;
endTime.setMinutes(then.getMinutes()+10);

refresh();

function refresh(){
    var diff = Math.abs((endTime-new Date().getTime())/1000);
    document.getElementById("time_left").innerHTML = 
               zeroPad(Math.floor(diff/3600)) +
         ":" + zeroPad(Math.floor(diff/60))+
         ":" + zeroPad(Math.floor((diff%60)));

    if (new Date < endTime){
        setTimeout(refresh,1000);
    }
}

// zeroPad method:
function zeroPad(nr,base,chr){
        var  len = (String(base||10).length - String(nr).length)+1;
        return len > 0? new Array(len).join(chr||'0')+nr : nr;
}

JsFiddle

BTW: using setTimeout has the advantage of being able to stop the timer any time (see also...).

Here's a page to test the accuracy of timeouts, used in this SO Question.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.