Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is more a, I'm kind of curious to know if it would make sense question, than a, I have a real problem question, I'm interessted in your opinion. If there are any syntax errors, I use pseudo-code to illustrate what intent to describe.

I have a program that uses a for-loop.

for (frame_pos = 0; frame_pos < frame_size; frame_pos++) {
 ABC...
}

Now I want to add another possible way to iterate through my program.

for (frame_pos = framelist.first; framlist.hasNext; frame_pos = framelist.getNext) {
 ABC...
}

So I wrote an if statement

if(a == true){
 for (frame_pos = 1; frame_pos <= frame_size; frame_pos++) {
  ABC...
 }
}else{
 for (frame_pos = framelist.first; framlist.hasNext; frame_pos = framelist.getNext) {
  ABC...
 }
}

But somehow I didn't like it beacause I had duplicated my code.

  ABC...

Of course I could move everything from within my loops to a method and only invoke that method. But I was wondering, if something like

switch(a){
case(true):
 for (frame_pos = 1; frame_pos <= frame_size; frame_pos++) {
 break;
default:
 for (frame_pos = framelist.first; framlist.hasNext; frame_pos = framelist.getNext) {
 break; 
}

would be possible and, if possible, usefull and make sense, because I would have used it here. It, of course, doesn't necessarily has to be a switch-case it could be some other mechanism. But my intention was/is to split the, from my point of view, atomic

for( ; ; ) {
...
}

body and recombine it.

share|improve this question
    
duff's device... no, I'll get my coat –  doctorlove Jul 4 '13 at 10:06
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you really don't want to make ABC a function an then switch between two different for loops you could instead write three functions:

int initFramepos( int a ) 
{ 
    return( a ? 1 : framelist.first );
}

int checkFramepos( int frame_pos, int a )
{
    return( a ? frame_pos < frame_size ? framelist.hasNext );
}

int incrFramepos( int frame_pos, int a )
{
    return( a ? frame_pos+1 ? framelist.getNext );
}

Then your for-loop could look like this:

for( frame_pos = initFramepos( a ); checkFramepos( frame_pos, a ); frame_pos = incrFramepos( frame_pos, a ) )
{
     ABC
}
share|improve this answer
    
though your answer is, kind of a extension of alks answer and matthias' comment, on alks answer, it seems kind of plausible to me and I ask myself why I wasn't able to think harder and come up with it myself :D. With your approach I don't need to change the way I iterate, wether one way nor another. –  aldr Jul 5 '13 at 10:41
add comment

Make ABC a function (extract method) and call that.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you do not want to switch between both method during run-time, you could solve this on pre-processor level:

#define _USENEXT /* Comment out this line to use the "counter" approach. */

...
for (
#ifdef _USENEXT
  frame_pos = framelist.first; framlist.hasNext; frame_pos = framelist.getNext
#else
  frame_pos = 1; frame_pos <= frame_size; frame_pos++
#endif
)
{
  <some code>
}

As an alternative to #defineing _USENEXT in the code as by my example, one could specify it as option when compiling. For gcc this would be -D _USENEXT.

share|improve this answer
1  
Of course, you could also do the comparison during runtime, if you need to do that: for (frame_pos = a ? 0 : framelist.first; a ? frame_pos < frame_size : framelist.hasNext; frame_pos = a ? frame_pos + 1 : framelist.getNext) –  Matthias Jul 4 '13 at 10:18
1  
@Matthias: I didn't want to say it not possible to switch during run-time. I just gave a proposal on how to solve the OP's issues if there is no need to switch between both methods during run-time. However, I feel your approach is difficult to read ... –  alk Jul 4 '13 at 10:22
add comment

Some languages have mechanisms to easily make such patterns reusable. C# for example, would let you write something like the following:

IEnumerable<Frame> Frames1() {
   for (frame_pos = 0; frame_pos < frame_size; frame_pos++) {
    yield return framelist[framepos];
   }
}
IEnumerable<Frame> Frames2() {
  for (frame_pos = framelist.first; framlist.hasNext; frame_pos = framelist.getNext) {
    yield return framelist[framepos];
   }
}

And then you can use treat these iteration patterns as first class objects like any other.

foreach(var frame in a? Frames1() : Frames2()) {
   ABC...
}

With such a feature you can avoid implementation details like those silly boilerplatey low-level error-prone primitive for loops from C.

C++ doesn't have such a syntactic feature, but it also has a similar established mechanism for reusing iteration patterns: iterators. Writing an iterator isn't as dead simple as in C#, though :(

But standard containers already provide suitable iterators. You can then reuse any of the many existing iteration patterns provided in the standard library.

std::vector<int> v = ...;
std::set<int> s = ...;
auto are_equal = std::equal(v.begin(), v.end(), s.begin(), s.end());

Good C++ libraries will similarly provide suitable iterators too. (Yeah, good luck with that; it seems a large portion of people writing "C++ libraries" doesn't know C++)

share|improve this answer
    
Oh boy, I slipped two rants into the same answer and was about to add a third. I should get some tea :S –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 4 '13 at 10:30
    
well, the truth has to be told :D –  aldr Jul 4 '13 at 11:06
add comment

The clean solution (for C++ code - this will not work for C) would be to write an iterator class implementation for your specific case. Then, you could write your client code in terms of an iterator, and decide what iteration means independent of how it is implemented (you will be able to decide what iteration means for you at any point, without changing client code at all).

If you do this and specialize std::begin and std::end, you will be able to use the entire iterators algorithms library in std as a bonus: (sort, copy, find/find_if, for_each, all_of, any_if, transform and accumulate are the most useful, out of the top of my head).

Regarding other solutions, do not use a macro: it results in brittle code with many difficult to see caveats. As a rule of thumb, using a macro in C++ should be (close to) the last considered solution for anything.

share|improve this answer
    
the question is tagged C so that might not be applicable –  Tom Tanner Jul 4 '13 at 12:00
    
Oh, I hadn't even noticed that. I edited my post (I normally look at questions tagged C++ and don't look explicitly at the tags). –  utnapistim Jul 4 '13 at 13:12
add comment

What you describing here is exactly the problem that strategy pattern was meant to solve. Basically, what you need to do here is to make each loop as a method within a class, and then set one of them as your strategy. And of course you can switch between strategies whenever you want.

it will look like this:

 class Strategy {
    virtual void func () = 0;
 };

.

 class StrategyA : public Strategy {
    virtual void func () {
         for (frame_pos = 0; frame_pos < frame_size; frame_pos++) {
        ABC...
         }
    }
};

.

class StrategyB : public Strategy {
virtual void func () {
        for (frame_pos = framelist.first; framlist.hasNext; frame_pos = framelist.getNext) {
            //ABC...
        }
    }
};

.

class StrategyToTake {

private:
Strategy* strategy;

public:
void execute () {strategy->func();}
void setStrategy (Strategy* newStrategy) {this.strategy = newStrategy;}

};

.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this "virtual" approach, however it does not answer the OP's question on how to avoid coding ABC twice. –  alk Jul 5 '13 at 5:55
1  
I value this answer, as well. Even so, it doesn't answer my the question I intended AND doesn't prevent me from duplicating ABC, it's a clear, Object oriented approach! I would use it, but as ABC indicates, I only need to change the for loops head, no change in ABC's functionallity. If I was to change ABC to DEF this would be terrific and exactly what I wanted. In any case, it is a good answer! –  aldr Jul 5 '13 at 10:18
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.