Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose you open two directories that you search for by ls -Q and grep

$ mkdir "example 1"
$ mkdir "example 2"
$ ls -Q | grep example | xargs -t nautilus

Then the option -t shows nautilus example 1 example 2 without quotes. However, the folders are opened correctly.

$ ls -Q | grep example | xargs -t echo
echo example 1 example 2 
example 1 example 2

And to be totally complete, let me show the input for xargs:

$ ls -Q | grep example
"example 1"
"example 2"

So the quotes where there...

What is going on here? Where did the quotes go?

share|improve this question
    
The quotes were never a part of the filename(s). Do ls example* and you'll figure it. –  devnull Jul 4 '13 at 10:37
2  
Do ls -Q | grep example and you see what -Q does w.r.t quotes. :-) –  Anne van Rossum Jul 4 '13 at 10:43
    
Sweet. Never knew that ls provides an option to quote entries. –  devnull Jul 4 '13 at 10:45
    
Yes, it's a very convenient flag once you know it. –  Anne van Rossum Jul 4 '13 at 10:48

1 Answer 1

xargs considers quotes and backslash as special. If you want it to emit quotes, you'll need to escape those. Pass the grep output to sed to escape the quotes for you:

$ ls -Q | grep example | sed 's/"/\\"/g' | xargs echo
"example 1" "example 2"
share|improve this answer
    
The funny thing is that - apparently - NOT nautilus example 1 example 2 but nautilus "example 1" "example 2" is called, because it works correctly (see nautilus example) WITHOUT adding escaped quotes. I would like to know why. –  Anne van Rossum Jul 4 '13 at 11:26
    
Also observe that ls -Q | grep example | xargs -t -d '\n' does pass the quotes unaltered. –  Anne van Rossum Jul 4 '13 at 11:29
    
I think it's a "bug" in xargs output: ls -Q | grep example | tr '\n' ' ' | xargs -t nautilus works fine, so it's not that secretly a new line is used as separator. However, ls -Q | grep example | tr '"' ' ' | xargs -t nautilus does not work. So, when actively removing the (undisplayed!) quotes, xargs will fail. –  Anne van Rossum Jul 4 '13 at 11:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.