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PWhen I am trying to load something I dumped using cPickle, I get the error message:

ValueError: insecure string pickle

Both the dumping and loading work are done on the same computer, thus same OS: Ubuntu 8.04.

How could I solve this problem?

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If I can cPickle.dump that object, why can't I cPickle.load that object? Isn't it strange? Python does stupid things some times. –  Peter Long Nov 17 '09 at 5:46
    
I got this when I stored pickled data in database in django application. Then I manually changed the string via admin interface and broke it. (I think that django dropped \n characters) –  SummerBreeze Mar 12 '13 at 10:53
    
@SummerBreeze : How did you fix it . I am facing the same problem while editing with django-admin . Thanks in advance . –  Ayush Tiwari Jul 9 at 12:35
    
@AyushTiwari was changing values with shell (and then moved to json) –  SummerBreeze Jul 9 at 13:35
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4 Answers

Check this thread. Peter Otten says:

A corrupted pickle. The error is raised if a string in the dump does not both start and end with " or '.

and shows a simple way to reproduce such "corruption". Steve Holden, in the follow-up post, suggests another way to cause the problem would be to mismatch 'rb' and 'wb' (but in Python 2 and on Linux that particular mistake should pass unnoticed).

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I have read that article. I can't agree with him. As my program is running on linux and python 2. And there should be any miss-match ' or ". As the dump is generated by python too, I think the dump method of python can handled the miss-match issue, right? –  Peter Long Nov 17 '09 at 9:50
    
@Peter, I know of no such cases (but, check the Python tracker). Pickling can (and often does for user-coded classes) call user-coded methods such as __reduce__ &c, so errors in such user-coded methods are much more likely than a never-observed bug in Python itself in a functionality that's used billions of times a day all over the world. (user-coded may well be from whatever third party modules you're using, of course, it's just "as opposed to Python's internal machinery"!-). –  Alex Martelli Nov 17 '09 at 15:19
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What are you doing with data between dump() and load()? It's quite common error to store pickled data in file opened in text mode (on Windows) or in database storage in the way that doesn't work properly for binary data (VARCHAR, TEXT columns in some databases, some key-value storages). Try to compare pickled data that you pass to storage and immediately retrieved from it.

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"are much more likely than a never-observed bug in Python itself in a functionality that's used billions of times a day all over the world": it always amazes me how cross people get in these forums.

One easy way to get this problem is by forgetting to close the stream that you're using for dumping the data structure. I just did

>>> out = open('xxx.dmp', 'w')
>>> cPickle.dump(d, out)
>>> k = cPickle.load(open('xxx.dmp', 'r'))
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: insecure string pickle

Which is why I came here in the first place, because I couldn't see what I'd done wrong.
And then I actually thought about it, rather than just coming here, and realized that I should have done:

>>> out = open('xxx.dmp', 'w')
>>> cPickle.dump(d, out)
>>> out.close() # close it to make sure it's all been written
>>> k = cPickle.load(open('xxx.dmp', 'r'))

Easy to forget. Didn't need people being told that they are idiots.

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I got the Python ValueError: insecure string pickle message in a different way.

For me it happened after a base64 encoding a binary file and passing through urllib2 sockets.

Initially I was wrapping up a file like this

with open(path_to_binary_file) as data_file:
    contents = data_file.read() 
filename = os.path.split(path)[1]

url = 'http://0.0.0.0:8080/upload'
message = {"filename" : filename, "contents": contents}
pickled_message = cPickle.dumps(message)
base64_message = base64.b64encode(pickled_message)
the_hash = hashlib.md5(base64_message).hexdigest()

server_response = urllib2.urlopen(url, base64_message)

But on the server the hash kept coming out differently for some binary files

decoded_message = base64.b64decode(incoming_base64_message)
the_hash = hashlib.md5(decoded_message).hexdigest()

And unpickling gave insecure string pickle message

cPickle.loads(decoded_message)

BUT SUCCESS

What worked for me was to use urlsafe_b64encode()

base64_message = base64.urlsafe_b64encode(cPickle.dumps(message))

And decode with

base64_decoded_message = base64.urlsafe_b64decode(base64_message)

References

http://docs.python.org/2/library/base64.html

https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3548.html#section-3

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