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Are threads of the same process (program) ever distributed across multiple cores?

In a multi core/processor system does each core have access to the whole of RAM or is the RAM logically divided up amongst cores?

Would it not be possible for the two cores to be processing different threads each of which needs to "lock" access to a RAM address in order to guarantee atomicity. On a single core, every assembler code instruction is atomic as the quantum of atomicity is the core clock cycle. On a multi core this can not be assumed because although the first core has not stepped forward to the next assembler instruction, another core might have already messed with the value in RAM which the first core initially loaded into a register to process.

Intuitively I know this must cause a problem in a multicore system but I have nothing solid to continue my research. All help thankfully received.

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Yes multiple threads can access the same memory - it is up to you to write your threads so this is not a problem. It is the very essence of what is called "thread-safe" programming. Note also that well written code will preserve cache coherence 90% of the time - the cores will be working on different "copies" of the data. But the moment another thread writes to a block I have in my cache, it is dirty and I can't use it. Huge speed penalty. – Floris Jul 4 '13 at 11:33
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I recommend a college-level operating systems textbook, and possibly a database systems one. Both deal with how to resolve synchronisation issues. – millimoose Jul 4 '13 at 11:35
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Also because of modern CPU architectures (with pipelining and out-of-order execution), even instructions on a single core aren't "atomic". – millimoose Jul 4 '13 at 11:40
    
thanks millimoose for pointing that, I would have said it. also there are internal clocks which runs at different speeds that global CPU clock to execute different instructions. (for example P4 ALU runs at x2). And not only that, but instructions are macros which expands into micro code RISC instruction batches. so very much NOT atomic. Not talking about some instructions like integer divide that takes VARIOUS number of cycles depending on operands, and can go up to 20 and more to finish. – v.oddou Mar 20 '14 at 1:47

Are threads of the same process (program) ever distributed across multiple cores?

Yes and no. Check the documentation for your operating system.

In a multi core/processor system does each core have access to the whole of RAM or is the RAM logically divided up amongst cores?

All cores can access all RAM - within reason - and subject to conditions placed upon it by the operating system. In some architectures a single CPU is a "gatekeeper" to some aspects of the system. Please check the documentation for your operating system and system architecture.

Would it not be possible for the two cores to be processing different threads each of which needs to "lock" access to a RAM address in order to guarantee atomicity. On a single core, every assembler code instruction is atomic as the quantum of atomicity is the core clock cycle. On a multi core this can not be assumed because although the first core has not stepped forward to the next assembler instruction, another core might have already messed with the value in RAM which the first core initially loaded into a register to process.

Of course. Please check the documentation for your operating system - and locking primitives for user applications.

Intuitively I know this must cause a problem in a multicore system but I have nothing solid to continue my research. All help thankfully received.

There are books and documents about the Linux operating system which may be good reading for someone interested as yourself in such principles (how about starting with Linux Memory Barriers). I personally recommend the book "Solaris Internals" as a great description of a multi-processor operating system.

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I'm going to sum up your answer for you: RTFM. – v.oddou Mar 20 '14 at 1:44

I'm also going to say a bit of RTFM because your question is broad and calls for a large educational string of readings. Notably about microprocessors, and about concurrency. (You may read in any order, or even entangled)

So you have to read about, in this order:

  • cpu execution pipelines
  • cpu caches / hierarchical memory
  • NUMA
  • multithreading programming

Let's go.

CPU

Here is a very nice article about out of order modern processors:

http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/general-programming/a-journey-through-the-cpu-pipeline-r3115
This is excellent and comments will give you further links for study.

It is of great importance considering your question and how you formulate it, that you learn more about what is really going on in a CPU.

Caches

There are also amazing articles about how caching works, which will be a perfect complement for the article above (that talks about pipeline):
===> http://lwn.net/Articles/250967/ <===
This previous link is the link !

as asides, but will say the same thing in quicker to read manner:
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/How-The-Memory-Cache-Works/481/1 http://web.cs.mun.ca/~paul/cs3725/material/web/notes/node3.html

very comprehensive:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CPU_cache

or this one on a "beginner" tone, easier to read:
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2002/07/caching/

NUMA

Now, about your "RAM divided among cores?" question, it can indeed happen in NUMA systems:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa363804(v=vs.85).aspx
NUMA exists in opteron and core i7 processors, though activated only mostly on servers configurations. But the technology exists (and has been for a long time).

Programming

Then this one that is talking about memory barriers:
http://mechanical-sympathy.blogspot.jp/2011/07/memory-barriersfences.html

Here is a take on your question about "if multiple threads of the same process will run on different CPUs":
http://www2.cs.ucy.ac.cy/carch/xi/papers/MigrationCAN.pdf
The fast answer is "yes of course", and they will also move (migrate) from time to time.

About lockless (you may have heard of it), a personal recommendation about a great perspective on performance multi thread programming and that mitigates lockless by saying:

Lockless algorithms are not guaranteed to be faster than algorithms that use locks

this should get into people's heads more:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ee418650(v=vs.85).aspx

Then I recommend this (my own article):
http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/general-programming/multithreading-r3048
It is less educational in the sense its more for already warned programmers and has no teaching flow built to it. But maybe a good recap. Also it is a mine of quality links which I highly recommend to read attentively.
Notably lock free data structures by Alexandrescu:
http://erdani.com/publications/cuj-2004-10.pdf

good reading !

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