Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've written some Perl code which compose 2 classes inherent from a base one. I suppose it would print something like this

Mik: Meow! Meow!
Sat: Woof! Woof!

But it actually print this way:

Sat: Woof! Woof!
Sat: Woof! Woof!

,

package Animal;
sub new {

    my $obj = shift;
    my $name = shift;
    our %pkg = ( 'name' => $name );
    bless \%pkg, $obj;
    return \%pkg;
}

package Cat;
@ISA = ("Animal");

sub new {
    my $obj = shift;
    my $name = shift;
    my $self =  $obj->SUPER::new($name);
    return $self;
}

sub get_name {
    my $obj = shift;
    return $obj->{'name'};
}


sub talk {
    my $obj = shift;
    return "Meow! Meow!";
}

package Dog;
@ISA = ("Animal");

sub new {
    my $obj = shift;
    my $name = shift;
    my $self = $obj->SUPER::new( $name );
    return $self;
}

sub get_name {
    my $obj = shift;
    return $obj->{'name'};
}

sub talk {
    my $obj = shift;
    return "Woof! Woof!";
}

package Main;

my $cat = new Cat('Mike');
my $dog = new Dog('Sat');

print $cat->get_name() . ": " . $cat->talk() , "\n"; 
print $dog->get_name() . ": " . $dog->talk() , "\n";

But if I change the caller in this way, it prints what I suppose to be. So it is quite strange why the $cat object was overwritten after the $dog was instantiated ?

package Main;

my $cat = new Cat('Mily');
print $cat->get_name() . ": " . $cat->talk() , "\n"; 

my $dog = new Dog('Sat');
print $dog->get_name() . ": " . $dog->talk() , "\n";
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Why do you bless into a global variable? Change your constructor to:

sub new {
    my $obj = shift;
    my $name = shift;
    my %pkg = ( 'name' => $name );
    bless \%pkg, $obj;
    return \%pkg;
}

Better yet, change it to something more idiomatic:

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    my $name  = shift;
    my $self  = { name => $name };
    return bless $self, $class;
}

Moving on:

Why implement new and get_name in each kind of animal? Both methods can be inherited. While we're at it, we might as well get rid off the messing around with @ISA:

package Animal;
sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    my $name  = shift;
    my $self  = { name => $name };
    return bless $self, $class;
}

sub get_name {
    my $self = shift;
    return $self->{'name'};
}

package Cat;
use base qw/ Animal /;

sub talk {
    my $self = shift;
    return "Meow! Meow!";
}

package Dog;
use base qw/ Animal /;

sub talk {
    my $self = shift;
    return "Woof! Woof!";
}

package Main;

my $cat = Cat->new('Mike');
my $dog = Dog->new('Sat');

print $cat->get_name() . ": " . $cat->talk() , "\n"; 
print $dog->get_name() . ": " . $dog->talk() , "\n";

May I ask which tutorial or book you are following?

While the above is perfectly fine, you might as well do it the Modern Perl way:

package Animal;
use Moose;
has name => ( required => 1, is => 'rw', isa => 'Str' );

package Cat;
use Moose;
extends 'Animal';

has talk => ( default => "Meow! Meow!", is => 'ro' );

package Dog;
use Moose;
extends 'Animal';

has talk => ( default => "Woof! Woof!", is => 'ro' );

package Main;
my $cat = Cat->new( name => 'Mike');
my $dog = Dog->new( name => 'Sat');

print $cat->name . ": " . $cat->talk , "\n"; 
print $dog->name . ": " . $dog->talk , "\n";
share|improve this answer
1  
Well, yes. Good OO design is always hard; the best the language can do is not get in your way. But I think that Moose makes it easier to get a feel for the correctness of your design. Take the example above. talk is used a a method, yet it is really only an attribute. Thus it should be a method in the base class that uses another attribute in the child classes. I find it harder to see stuff like this in the old fashioned form. –  innaM Jul 4 '13 at 15:58
    
@innaM Thanks very much for your help. Let me explain something. 1. I really get confused that my Dog instance overwritten my Cat so that I'd like to check details in each class. I don't really mean to define get_name in each class. 2. I used to work with a lot of very old Unix machines so that I have to code in Perl 5.8 and must avoid to write anything newer than it. :-( . 3. Specifically for this question, it was a Python program I met somewhere in the Web, and I'd like to translate in into Perl one. But unfortunately slip on it. –  David Young Jul 7 '13 at 8:35

You have declared the variable to store the instance data using

our %pkg

This is an alias for a single data structure (%Animal::pkg), so all your objects are using the same hash. Change our to my in order to create a new hash each time.


It might be worth noting that "inside-out" objects in Perl can and do use a shared data structure in the package to store instance data, but there is an additional level of abstraction required to make that work, and I wouldn't recommend starting OO Perl with them, they are an acquired taste.

share|improve this answer

In a nutshell: our declares package variables, so every time our %pkg = (...) is executed, you assign a new value to the same variable. As all \%pkg references point to the same var, all return values of new are the same object. A reference can only be blessed into one class, so the last one wins.

Just change the our to my, and it should work as expected.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.