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I'm trying to craft a regular expression that will match something like this:

[[uid::page name|page alias]]

for example:

[[nw::Home|Home page]]

The uid and page alias are both optional.

I want to allow the delimiters :: or | to appear only once, and only in the order shown. However, the character : should be allowed anywhere after the uid. Herein lies the problem.

The following regex works pretty well, except that it matches strings where :: appears twice, or in the wrong place:

regex = r'\[\[([\w]+::)?([^|\t\n\r\f\v]+)(\|[^|\t\n\r\f\v]+)?\]\]'
re.match(regex, '[[Home]]') # matches, good
re.match(regex, '[[Home|Home page]]') # matches, good
re.match(regex, '[[nw::Home]]') # matches, good
re.match(regex, '[[nw::Home|Home page]]') # matches, good
re.match(regex, '[[nw|Home|Home page]]') # doesn't match, good
re.match(regex, '[[nw|Home::Home page]]') # matches, bad
re.match(regex, '[[nw::Home::Home page]]') # matches, bad

I have read all about negative lookahead and lookbehind expressions but I can't figure out how to apply them in this case. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Edit: I would also like to know how to prevent the delimiters from being included in the match results as shown here:

('nw::', 'Home', '|Home page')

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1  
Can you please elaborate on what you mean by "However, the character : should be allowed anywhere after the uid"? All of the matches/non-matches you have given don't seem to feature any odd appearance of the character order. –  Tom Lord Jul 4 '13 at 15:39
    
This is somewhat similar to the problem of writing a correct regex for C comments: /* ** */ It can be done, but it's tricky. Look up "C comment regex" for ideas. –  Gene Jul 4 '13 at 15:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If I understand your needs correctly, you could use this:

\[\[(?:(?<uid>\w+)::)?(?!.*::)(?<page>[^|\t\n\r\f\v]+)(?:\|(?<alias>[^|\t\n\r\f\v]+))?\]\]
                      ^^^^^^^^

See here for a demo. I added a negative lookahead after the uid capture.

I have given names to the captured groups but if you don't want them, that's the one without named captured groups:

\[\[(?:(\w+)::)?(?!.*::)([^|\t\n\r\f\v]+)(?:\|([^|\t\n\r\f\v]+))?\]\]
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+1 nice catch.... –  Anirudha Jul 4 '13 at 15:48
1  
?P<..> instead of ?<..> –  falsetru Jul 4 '13 at 15:53
    
@falsetru: Thanks! I forgot that python had a slightly different way of naming capture groups. It'd be thus: \[\[(?:(?P<uid>\w+)::)?(?!.*::)(?P<page>[^|\t\n\r\f\v]+)(?:\|(?P<alias>[^|\t\n\‌​r\f\v]+))?\]\] –  Jerry Jul 4 '13 at 15:58
    
Wow, brilliant. Yes, it works and passes all my unit tests. –  nw. Jul 4 '13 at 16:02
    
@nw. Awesome! I was afraid I missed something! –  Jerry Jul 4 '13 at 16:03

So, what do you think of this one:

import re

regex = r'''
    \[\[                            # opening [[
        ([\w ]+)                    # first word (with possible spaces)
        (?:
            ::                      # the two colons
            (                       # second word (with possible spaces and single colons)
                [\w ]+              # word characters and spaces
                (?:
                    :               # a colon
                    [\w ]+          # word characters and spaces
                )*                  # not required, but can repeat unlimitted
            )
        )?                          # not required
        (?:
            \|                      # a pipe
            ([\w ]+)                # thid word (with possible spaces)
        )?
    \]\]                            # closing ]]
'''

test_strings = (
    '[[Home]]',
    '[[Home|Home page]]',
    '[[nw::Home]]',
    '[[nw::Home|Home page]]',
    '[[nw|Home|Home page]]',
    '[[nw|Home::Home page]]',
    '[[nw::Home::Home page]]',
    '[[nw::Home:Home page]]',
    '[[nw::Home:Home page|Home page]]'
)

for test_string in test_strings:
    print re.findall(regex, test_string, re.X)

Outputs:

[('Home', '', '')]
[('Home', '', 'Home page')]
[('nw', 'Home', '')]
[('nw', 'Home', 'Home page')]
[]
[]
[]
[('nw', 'Home:Home page', '')]

It doesn't use lookaheads/behinds. It does allow single colons in the string after the first :: (as demonstrated by the last two test strings). The short version for the regex would be:

\[\[([\w ]+)(?:::([\w ]+(?::[\w ]+)*))?(?:\|([\w ]+))?\]\]

Only thing is that you have to check if the second match is empty, if so, there was not double colon (::) and you should use the first match, where normally the string BEFORE the colon will be.

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Does this work ?? - http://ideone.com/NeIouP

import re
regex = r'\[\[(([\w]+)::)?([^|\t\n\r\f\v]+)(\|([^\t\n\r\f\v]+))?\]\]'
print re.match(regex, '[[Home]]').group(2,3,5) # matches, good
print re.match(regex, '[[Home|Home page]]').group(2,3,5) # matches, good
print re.match(regex, '[[nw::Home]]').group(2,3,5) # matches, good
print re.match(regex, '[[nw::Home|Home page]]').group(2,3,5) # matches, good
print re.match(regex, '[[nw|Home|Home page]]').group(2,3,5) # doesn't match, good
print re.match(regex, '[[nw|Home::Home page]]').group(2,3,5) # matches, bad
print re.match(regex, '[[nw::Home::Home page]]').group(2,3,5) # matches, bad
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