Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

At the moment I have a custom validation attribute called ExistingFileName (below) but i have given it error messages to display

    protected override System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.ValidationResult IsValid(object value, System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        if (value!=null)
        {
            string fileName = value.ToString();
            if (FileExists(fileName))
            {
                return new ValidationResult("Sorry but there is already an image with this name please rename your image");
            }
            else
            {
                return ValidationResult.Success;
            }  
        }
        else
        {
            return new ValidationResult("Please enter a name for your image");
        }
    }

I have implemented it like so:

[ExistingFileName]
public string NameOfImage { get; set; }

Im sure theres a way to define the error message when setting the attribute like below:

[ExistingFileName(errormessage="Blah blah blah")]
public string NameOfImage { get; set; }

But I'm not sure how? Any help is greatly appreciated

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of returning ValidationResult with a predefined string, try using the ErrorMessage property, or any other custom properties. For example:

private const string DefaultFileNotFoundMessage = 
    "Sorry but there is already an image with this name please rename your image";

private const string DefaultErrorMessage = 
    "Please enter a name for your image";

public string FileNotFoundMessage { get; set; }

protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value, ValidationContext validationContext)
{
    if (value!=null)
    {
        string fileName = value.ToString();
        if (FileExists(fileName))
        {
            return new ValidationResult(FileNotFoundMessage ??
                                        DefaultFileNotFoundMessage);
        }
        else
        {
            return ValidationResult.Success;
        }  
    }
    else
    {
        return new ValidationResult(ErrorMessage ?? 
                                    DefaultErrorMessage);
    }
}

And in your annotation:

[ExistingFileName(FileNotFoundMessage = "Uh oh! Not Found!")]
public string NameOfImage { get; set; }

If you don't explicitely set a custom message, it will fallback to the predefined constant in your custom attribute.

share|improve this answer

Have you inherited from ValidationAttribute?

then you don't need to keep it in a separate variable. All error message code is available when you inherit from ValidationAttribute class.

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Field | AttributeTargets.Property, AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = true)]
public class ExistingFileNameAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    public string FileFoundMessage = "Sorry but there is already an image with this name please rename your image";
    public ExistingFileNameAttribute()
        : base("Please enter a name for your image")
    {            
    }

    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        if (value!=null)
        {
            string fileName = value.ToString();
            if (FileExists(fileName))
            {
                return new ValidationResult(FileFoundMessage);
            }
            else
            {
                return ValidationResult.Success;
            }  
        }
        else
        {
            return new ValidationResult(ErrorMessage);
        }
    }
}

Now you can use this to validate your fields/properties

[ExistingFileName(ErrorMessage="Blah blah blah", FileFoundMessage = "Blah Bla")]
public string NameOfImage { get; set; }

and if you use it like below.

[ExistingFileName]
public string NameOfImage { get; set; }

then, it will use the default error message set in the constructor of the ExistingFileName attribute

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
A lot, thank you for that. –  Luis Gouveia Jul 10 at 17:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.