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for(var i=0;i<5;i++){}
alert(i);

in javascript this will get us 5 other languages like C++, java, c# .... will simply give an error that the i variable isn't defined in the context.

So why the for loop counter doesn't get destroyed after exiting the loop in javascript?

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1  
possible duplicate of variable hoisting –  Ryan Cavanaugh Jul 4 '13 at 17:13
    
all you need to know stackoverflow.com/questions/500431/javascript-variable-scope –  Kola Jul 4 '13 at 17:14
    
thanks, the links really helped. –  user1525337 Jul 4 '13 at 17:21
    
    
Variable scope: –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 4 '13 at 20:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This is because the JavaScript engine will move ("hoist") the variable decalaration to the top of the function no matter where it is declared inside the function1. JavaScript does not have block scope.

{
//Some code
    for(var i=0;i<5;i++){}
    alert(i);
//Some code
}

Is equivalent to:

{
  var i;
 //.. some code
 for(i=0;i<5;i++){}
    alert(i);
}

1 Unless it's the exception being caught with a catch clause; that variable is scoped to catch block.

Update

For defining block scope variables ecmascript 6 specs (javascript 1.7) introduces let. Currently this will work only in latest version of FireFox browser and in consensus stage.

<script type="application/javascript;version=1.7">
     //Some code

        for (let i = 0; i < 10; i++) {

            alert(i); // 1, 2, 3, 4 ... 9
        }

        alert(i); // Here you will get an error here saying ReferenceError: i is not defined.
    }
</script>

Fiddle

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thanks, it's clear for me now. –  user1525337 Jul 4 '13 at 17:21
    
@user1525337 You are welcome. Probably read this about scopes - developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… –  PSL Jul 4 '13 at 17:22
1  
+ ok that is the reason JavaScript does not have block statement scope; Got it now, I didn't read your answer first but its very helpful answer. –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 4 '13 at 18:18
    
Maybe you should revise your first sentence because it makes it seem like this would work if it weren't for hoisting. –  finishingmove Jul 17 '13 at 16:46

Javascript only creates scopes for functions, with and catch blocks (with functions creating a scope for var statement), so equivalent to Java (and not working) would be:

(function(){
    for(var i=0;i<5;i++){}
})();
alert(i);
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1  
No, it also creates scopes for catch clauses. –  torazaburo Jul 4 '13 at 17:18
    
@torazaburo true, easy to forget :) –  Esailija Jul 4 '13 at 17:19
1  
@torazaburo It creates a scope for the variable containing the catch exception (defined in the catch clause), but it does not create a general scope for variables defined in the catch block, correct? (This seems to be what I'm experiencing here.) –  Jeremy Banks Jul 4 '13 at 17:31
    
I believe this answer is wrong. Neither with blocks nor catch blocks appear to create a new block scope. –  Jeremy Banks Jul 4 '13 at 20:28
    
You are right, variables defined within a catch clause are hoisted to the top of the function like any others, it is the caught variable that is in its own little context. Sorry for any confusion. I should have said "No, it also creates a scope for the variable caught in a catch clause." –  torazaburo Jul 4 '13 at 20:43

Variables in Javascript are subjected to var hoisting where the variable becomes declared above the block by the javascript engine.

See The Mozilla Javascript documents on var for an example of how this will work.

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