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In my data, I have variables as follows: household ID, ID of persons in household, father ID, years of education, who is the father. So person 3 in house 23 for example might say that person 1 is his or her father, while person 6 and 7 and 8 also in house 23 says that person 9 is their father. This is likely a joint family.

So I can't make a new column eduF in the usual way, since for person 3 and 6/7/8 in the same household, the father is different so the eduF level varies even in the same household. I need however this new column eduF saying, for each member of the family, what is the education level of the person they list to be their father.

I think this requires forvalues or foreach and loops, but am not sure what would be the code!

In the image of the sample, 'father i' and 'father n' mean that the father is dead or info not available. enter image description here

key pid fathID  yearsEDU
282 10  fath n  13
282 9   1       10
282 8   4   
282 7   4       12
282 6   4       14
282 5   fath n  10
282 4   1       9
282 3   1       8
282 2   fath i  
282 1   fath i  4
283 4   1       4
283 3   1       6
283 2   fath i  14
283 1   fath i  17
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Please give us at least a sample data to work –  Metrics Jul 4 '13 at 18:59
    
Can you add that in the question above; its not clearer in the comment –  Metrics Jul 4 '13 at 19:49
2  
To those contemplating a close vote, especially those who don't know Stata: This is programming. It just takes two lines in what is here a very concise and powerful language. –  Nick Cox Jul 4 '13 at 21:53
    
For the benefit of future users I changed the title and tags. The reference to education of fathers ties the question to specific details of the OP's dataset and the solution does not entail loops. –  Nick Cox Jul 5 '13 at 6:34
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the example given, the values of xpers run 1 up in each household. (If that's not true, it can be arranged).

There is a singular lack of information here about which variables are numeric, which are numeric with value labels and which are string.

But assuming that q0111 is string, we can get the numeric only values for fathers' identifiers by

gen fatherid = real(q0111)

Then it is

bysort xhhkey (xpers) : gen father_educ = q0407_a[fatherid]

The key idea here is that under the aegis of by: subscripts are interpreted within groups, and therefore the values of fatherid are precisely the subscripts we need.

As @Metrics asserted, no loop is necessary.

list xhhkey xpers q0111 q0407_a fatherid father_educ, sep(0)

     +-----------------------------------------------------------+
     | xhhkey   xpers      q0111   q0407_a   fatherid   father~c |
     |-----------------------------------------------------------|
  1. |    282       1   father i        13          .          . |
  2. |    282       2   father i        10          .          . |
  3. |    282       3          1         .          1         13 |
  4. |    282       4          1        12          1         13 |
  5. |    282       5   father n        14          .          . |
  6. |    282       6          4        10          4         12 |
  7. |    282       7          4         9          4         12 |
  8. |    282       8          4         8          4         12 |
  9. |    282       9          1         .          1         13 |
 10. |    282      10   father n         4          .          . |
 11. |    283       1   father i         4          .          . |
 12. |    283       2   father i         6          .          . |
 13. |    283       3          1        14          1          4 |
 14. |    283       4          1        17          1          4 |
 15. |    284       1   father i         5          .          . |
 16. |    284       2   father n         .          .          . |
 17. |    284       3          1         1          1          5 |
 18. |    284       4   father i         4          .          . |
 19. |    284       5   father n         8          .          . |
 20. |    284       6   father i         7          .          . |
 21. |    284       7   father n        18          .          . |
 22. |    284       8          6         2          6          7 |
 23. |    284       9          6         .          6          7 |
 24. |    284      10   father i         9          .          . |
     +-----------------------------------------------------------+

By the way, the terminology of columns is alien to Stata outside the context of matrices: they are variables.

There is a moderately detailed tutorial on by: in http://www.stata-journal.com/article.html?article=pr0004 Even experienced Stata users often underestimate what you can do with by:.

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+1: That works perfect. I will delete my answer, as it is not useful for future users. –  Metrics Jul 4 '13 at 21:57
    
THANK YOU so very much for your help, this is beautiful! –  user2551491 Jul 4 '13 at 22:11
1  
Thanks, but I'm just the messenger: You should send the congratulations to Stata's developers, especially William Gould who thought this up. –  Nick Cox Jul 4 '13 at 22:12
1  
bysort xhhkey (xpers) : gen father_educ = q0407_a[real(q0011)] should also work, but packing too much into one line can get too cryptic, reminiscent of APL or Perl. –  Nick Cox Jul 4 '13 at 22:14
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