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a = 218500000000

s = 6
f = 2
k = 49
d = k + f + s

r = a
i = 0

while (r >= d):
  r = r - d
  #print ('r = ',r)
  i = i+1
  #print ('i = ',i)

print (i)

I think it does what I expect it to, but its way too slow to calculate such a large number, I waited 5 mins for i to print (while python used 100% cpu to calculate..), but it didn't. Is there a more efficient way of rewriting this piece of code so I can see how many iterations (i) it takes to complete?

Many thanks

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What do you actually want it to do? What are you calculating? –  Jimmeh Nov 17 '09 at 9:55
1  
i, r = divmod(a, d) –  Miles Nov 17 '09 at 9:57
    
Sure looks like homework. –  S.Lott Nov 17 '09 at 11:16
    
@S.Lott: I wish SO existed while I was in school or even college. :) –  3zzy Nov 17 '09 at 12:00
    
@nimbuz: If it's not homework, please provide some context for why you're doing something so grotesquely inefficient. Where did you get this algorithm? Why are you using it? Only homework can justify such a terrible way to do a simple thing. –  S.Lott Nov 19 '09 at 3:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
r = (a % d)
i = (a / d)

Use the modulo and division operators.

There is also a divmod function to calculate both together:

i, r = divmod(a,d)
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+1 for a one-liner. :-D –  NawaMan Nov 17 '09 at 10:09

You can use i = a/d. :D

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1  
And r = a % d. –  NawaMan Nov 17 '09 at 9:56
    
Oh, is division faster than addition/subtraction? I'd love to know why! :) –  3zzy Nov 17 '09 at 9:59
    
Got the answer btw, 3833333333.33. Still, would like to know why division is faster? –  3zzy Nov 17 '09 at 10:00
2  
@Nimbuz, if you had to multiply 1000*234 would you sum 234 a thousand times or would you apply the multiplication algorithm? –  Nick Dandoulakis Nov 17 '09 at 10:05
1  
@:Numbuz, In your case, you are doing more that just a few addition/subtraction. In each loop, you do one add for i, one subtract for r and a condition of r and d. AND you are doing that million of times :p. –  NawaMan Nov 17 '09 at 10:07

Isn't a division what you're looking for?

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try 3833333333.3333333333333333333333. AKA r / d.

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Looks like you are doing truncating division to me. That is, you want to find out how many times d goes into a without knowing the remainder.

a = 218500000000
s = 6
f = 2
k = 49
d = k + f + s

i = a // d

print (i)
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