Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume that I have a table and to simplify things all rows are about Persons.
So assume that we store the person's color. Now let's make the simplification that we have 1 million records and all's color is white (stupid example but please bare with me).
Now in this case white is repeated over and over 1 million times.
Now if we can not change the table to be e.g. white_person table the way that it is, does it mean that the attribute color and person have a specific relationship that
1) justifies the repeating attribute in the table?
2) justifies the creation of a new table and treating it as a 1-N relationship? But formally how would this type of relationship be defined?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

If the same value is repeated on every row BECAUSE the dependency you actually wanted to model is ∅->{color} then your Persons table is in violation of 2NF: the determinant ∅ (the empty set) is a proper subset of a key. The change required to satisfy 2NF would be to remove the color attribute to a new table keyed on ∅ (i.e. a single row table). Or remove the attribute from the model altogether.

Note that a dependency is never automatically implied just because of a coincidence in some values in a table. What's at issue is what business rules you require the DBMS to enforce and whether the data model supports that properly.

I discussed a similar example here.

share|improve this answer
    
What is ∅->{color}? I am not sure what you mean? –  Jim Jul 6 '13 at 21:40
    
X->A means a functional dependency where the values of the attribute(s) X determine the values of A. If X is the empty set that means the value of A must be determined without reference to any other attribute and therefore the value of A is the same for every row. –  sqlvogel Jul 6 '13 at 22:10
add comment

If a fact can be assumed, it doesn't need to be stored. So if there is a personal attribute whose value is known in advance, that you know for sure is same for all the people in the database, and will always stay the same in the future, then you don't need to physically store it in the database at all.

But I doubt you can make such an assumption. To lower the cost of storing the many repeated strings, separate the color to its own table with a slim surrogate key (say, a byte or a 16-bit int), then reference it (via FOREIGN KEY) from the "big" table. This way, you are not repeating strings, you are repeating (slimmer) integers. This is not really a matter of normalization (both variants are "normalized"), but of optimizing the physical design.

However, if there is another attribute functionally dependent on color, then you should definitely have the separate table. Otherwise, there would be a transitive functional dependency PK -> color -> another, violating the 3NF.

For example:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Branko: "If a fact can be assumed, it doesn't need to be stored". Should assumptions be built into code or persisted in the database? I'd say it depends. First weigh up the potential costs and risks of having to re-release code if/when assumptions change vs having to update an item of data in the database. –  sqlvogel Jul 7 '13 at 13:09
    
@sqlvogel I was making a rather philosophical point. The "assumption" I described never changes. The real world, of course, works differently. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Jul 7 '13 at 14:17
    
+1:Interesting idea the reference to the other table.Is it a standard practice? –  Jim Jul 9 '13 at 20:45
    
@Jin Database design is not a cookie-cutter proposition. You cannot just take a "standard practice" (whatever it might be) and apply it unconditionally. No design is perfect - it's always a tradeoff. I believe this particular design would be a decent tradeoff for your particular situation, but only you have the full extent of the information to make the final decision. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Jul 9 '13 at 23:10
add comment

Now if we can not change the table to be e.g. white_person table the way that it is, does it mean that the attribute color and person have a specific relationship that

1) justifies the repeating attribute in the table?

Repeating attribute has a specific meaning in database technology. It does not mean you can find multiple rows that have the same value. (That's what rows are for.) You don't have a repeating attribute.

2) justifies the creation of a new table and treating it as a 1-N relationship? But formally how would this type of relationship be defined?

A 1-N relationship would be identified by a functional dependency--you'd find a person whose color is white and whose color is also fuschia. How many colors can a person be in your database?

share|improve this answer
    
1) It does not mean you can find multiple rows that have the same value. (That's what rows are for.) I am asking about a value of a column being the same across all rows. Not all rows having the same values across all column. 2) A 1-N relationship would be identified by a functional dependency yes but you can have a separate table for a 1-1 relationship. That was my meaning but perhaps I wasn't clear –  Jim Jul 5 '13 at 20:18
    
"I am asking about a value of a column being the same across all rows." And that's exactly what I'm talking about. That's what rows are for. You don't have a repeating attribute. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jul 5 '13 at 23:49
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.