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I'm a starter in neo4j and I wanna know if is possible find best paths using neo4j, where I have a cost, but I wanna first best path, and second best path and so on...

If I have 3 possible paths I need get all 3 in ordered by cost, if I have 100 possible paths I need limit the results too (for example, top 10 results).

This is possible in neo4j?

PS: in my tests I used java-astar-routing sample: https://github.com/neo4j-examples/java-astar-routing

Thanks and sorry for my poor english ;),

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You can use Dijkstra or A* and use finder.getAllPaths() which are then ordered by cost/weight. –  Michael Hunger Jul 7 '13 at 3:42
    
@MichaelHunger I think which finder.getAllPaths() returns all best paths, it will return more then one result if these paths has the same best cost. I need the first best, the second best and so on... –  Thiago Burgo Jul 8 '13 at 17:55
    
So iterate through the (lazy) result iterator and return one (if many) from the best score, one (if many) from the second best score... and so on. Dijkstra and AStar returns WeightedPath objects which has a cost accessor. –  Mattias Persson Jul 13 '13 at 20:06

2 Answers 2

Basically, what you want is ALL the paths between two nodes, then calculate their weights, and then sort them by cost.

The latter two bits are quite easy to do, now all you need is to find all the paths :

http://api.neo4j.org/current/org/neo4j/graphalgo/GraphAlgoFactory.html#allPaths(org.neo4j.graphdb.RelationshipExpander, int)

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in your solution, how i will know the order for the best paths and how I can limit paths to , for example, 3 first best paths –  Thiago Burgo Jul 8 '13 at 20:12
    
You just sort the collection of paths you get back, based on their weight. You do that manually in your code, not in Neo4j. It wouldn't make a difference to do it in Neo4J anyway, because they would still need to check all the paths to see if it belongs in the top 3 –  Pieter-Jan Jul 22 '13 at 8:18

You could also write your own traverser using a best-first ordering policy. Something like:

Traversal.traversal()
    .order( new MyOwnBestFirstOrdering() )
    ...
    .traverse( startNode );

class MyOwnBestFirstOrdering extends BestFirstSelectorFactory<Integer,Integer>
{
    @Override public Integer startData() {
        return 0;
    }

    ...
}
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