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Through the code i got the output content as XML. I have pair or multiple of XML tags as follows:

<p>December10</p>
<p>
</p>
<p>
</p>
<p>
</p>
<p>
</p>
<p>
</p>
<p> Welcome to this space </p>
<p>
</p>
<p>
</p>
<p>Hai, Today is Tuesday</p>
<p>
</p>
<p>
</p>
<p>
</p>
<p>This a xml tag</p>

I want a regular expression as below requirement:

As above mentioned i want only one EMPTY pair Tag as <p></p>. I do not want the repeated EMPTY indefinite or definite pair tags.

Please help me in this regard to use regular expression to overcome the issue.

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1  
    
In other words, you only want unique matches? This is out of the scope of regular expressions. You have to do it manually from code. What programming language are you using? –  intgr Nov 17 '09 at 10:27
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3 Answers 3

Oh God, please don't let bobince see you asking this question.

See: RegEx match open tags except XHTML self-contained tags or Parsing Html The Cthulhu Way

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he is coming! bobince is coming! oh God no! xD –  Arnis L. Nov 17 '09 at 10:22
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 s/(<p><\/p>)+/<p><\/p>/g;

this one work for me (meaning == I tested it with your tagsoup).. it is perl/sed syntax, s///g means 's' replace and 'g' global

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If this is .NET, you could try something like this:

Regex.Replace(content, "(<p>\s*</p>\s*?)+","<p></p>")

Or even better

Regex.Replace(content, "(<p>\s*</p>\s*?)+","<p/>")

(Edited to add Gumbo's suggestion)

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Most browsers don't support these tags: jsbin.com/edufi –  Kobi Nov 17 '09 at 10:26
1  
Don’t forget the whitespace between the elements. –  Gumbo Nov 17 '09 at 10:29
    
@Kobi: Do you mean the shortened tags? –  Konamiman Nov 17 '09 at 10:30
    
Yes, I tried it at least on Firefox and Chrome, though didn't play with doc type. –  Kobi Nov 17 '09 at 10:35
1  
You need another \s*? after </p>. (? because we don't want to match the trailing newline). –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 17 '09 at 10:52
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