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I have problems with generating proper error messages with Spring and Jackson. Scenario: A controller with a custom model a @ResponseBody (see below) a model with two attributes, that can possibly cause parsing errors. Now, I want to return a proper error message, if parsing of these fields fails (e.g. Got an invalid string for a Date).

If a parsing error happens, Spring will catch it and returns a 400 Bad Request response with HTML body. Though I am able to implement my own HandlerExceptionResolver, that catches this kind of exception to generate a meaningful error message. Unfortunately, I am only able to catch the first parsing error and not a possibly second one.

So, is there a way to collect all parsing/deserialization errors and generate a proper error message with all problems?

I am using Jackson 1.7.1 and Spring 3.2.2.


Some example code:

TimeController.java

@Controller
@RequestMapping("/time")
public class TimeController {
    @RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST)
    public @ResponseBody
    TimeDocument create(@RequestBody TimeDocument entity) {
        // magic
        return entity;
    }
}

TimeDocument.java

public class TimeDocument {
    public String name;
    public Date date1;
    public Date date2;
}

Request 1: I will get an 200 OK.

{
  "name": "test",
  "date1": 123,
  "date2": 1234
}

Request 2: I will get an 400 Bad Request, but I am able to generate a proper error message like: "Date 1 has an invalid format.".

{
  "name": "test",
  "date1": "crap",
  "date2": 1234
}

Request 3: I will get an 400 Bad Request, but I am not able to generate a proper error message like: "Date 1 has an invalid format. Date 2 has an invalid format.".

{
  "name": "test",
  "date1": "crap",
  "date2": "crap"
}
share|improve this question
    
Since I didn't find an adequate solution, yet, I am going to find another way solve my problem. (eg. a second client validation) –  Sven Walter Jul 9 '13 at 22:32

1 Answer 1

Well, I think you will better need to use Spring MVC Form Validation or just validate input values at client side using jquery.validate plugin (I am just assuming you are using jQuery because of @ResponseBody usage).

Otherwise, another solution that came to my mind is to implement something like this:

(First of all, add a getter and setter for a new field in your entity called message that will store the validation result).

Then:

@Controller
@RequestMapping("/time")
public class TimeController {
    @RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST)
    public @ResponseBody String create(@RequestBody TimeDocument entity) {

        String json = null;        

        try {

            //1. Create 'jackson' object mapper
            ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper();  

            //2. Capture data from your entity
            String name = entity.getName();
            Date date1 = entity.getDate1();
            Date date2 = entity.getDate2();

            //3. Validate 'name', 'date1', 'date2' with some regex (a possibility) or any method you want.

            //4. Suppossing that you implemented a method like this to validate your 'bean' or 'dto' that returns 'boolean'
            if(!validate(entity)) {

               //5. If everything is not according to your validation rules, set a message to your entity.
               entity.setMessage("There was an error in the input values.");
            }

            //6. Convert your 'bean' or 'dto' as 'json' string
            json = objectMapper.writeValueAsString(entity);            

        } catch (Exception ex) {
            //handle the Exception
        }

        return json;
    }
}

Now, at client side (suppossing you are using jQuery ajax or just $.post).

Do the following in the callback:

(..), function(data) {
   if(data != null) { //Callback is not null

      //Parse the 'String' result from 'Controller' as 'JSON' from 'Jackson'
      var obj = $.parseJSON(data);

      if(obj.message != '') {
         alert(obj.message) //An error ocurred in the validation.
      } else {
         //Show the data
         alert('Name: ' + obj.name + ' Date1: ' + obj.date1 + ' Date2: ' + obj.date2);
      }
   }
});

So, if there is no message present in the entity, that means that there is no error present. I will suggest this and also consider what I wrote in first lines to have a really good validation at client and server side.

share|improve this answer
    
This might be an idea, but it looks like hacking. Although, I will play around with this idea. –  Sven Walter Jul 5 '13 at 15:50
    
@SvenWalter Ok, just let me know how it goes and if you think this is your answer don't forget to check it. –  Oscar Jara Jul 5 '13 at 15:53

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