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I've declared a byte array (I'm using Java):

byte test[] = new byte[3];
test[0] = 0x0A;
test[1] = 0xFF;
test[2] = 0x01;

How could I print the different values stored in the array?

If I use System.out.println(test[0]) it will print '10'. I'd like it to print 0x0A

Thanks to everyone!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 35 down vote accepted
System.out.println(Integer.toHexString(test[0]));

OR (pretty print)

System.out.printf("0x%02X", test[0]);

OR (pretty print)

System.out.println(String.format("0x%02X", test[0]));
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1  
+1 for giving the printf example. –  Dave Webb Nov 17 '09 at 11:01
1  
Of all of these, the System.out.printf is probably the best idea. –  abyx Nov 17 '09 at 11:18
    
very useful, thumbs up –  Nicholas TJ Feb 18 '13 at 15:20
2  
But the Integer.toHexString will print 10 not 0x0A. –  tintinmj Feb 1 at 18:40
for (int j=0; j<test.length; j++) {
   System.out.format("%02X ", test[j]);
}
System.out.println();
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byte test[] = new byte[3];
test[0] = 0x0A;
test[1] = 0xFF;
test[2] = 0x01;

for (byte theByte : test)
{
  System.out.println(Integer.toHexString(theByte));
}

NOTE: test[1] = 0xFF; this wont compile, you cant put 255 (FF) into a byte, java will want to use an int.

you might be able to do...

test[1] = (byte) 0xFF;

I'd test if I was near my IDE (if I was near my IDE I wouln't be on Stackoverflow)

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You can definitely do byte b = 255 & 0xFF; And then when reading it int calculation = (0xFF &b) + 5; to read back 255 –  P-chan Mar 21 at 8:59

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