Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Im designing a small library and sometimes i write a couple lines and it just doesn't feel right, so i'd like to get the opinions/advices of an experimented java programmer.

Ive got a listener which handle 3 differents events and in one of my class I implement the methods that will actually fire the events

So what i did at first was something like this:

 protected final void fireOperationStarted(){
     OperationEvent event = new OperationEvent(this);

    for (OperationListener listener : listeners) {
        listener.operationStarted(event);
    }
}


protected final void fireOperationEnded(){
    OperationEvent event = new OperationEvent(this);

    for (OperationListener listener : listeners) {
        listener.operationEnded(event);
    }

//omitted the 3rd method on purpose

but this code felt wrong because if someone want to implement their own event, they will basically need access to the whole listener arraylist (CopyOnWriteArraylist) and write the logic again and again.

So what i opted for is a Fireable interface with a single method "fire". And this is what i've done:

protected final void fireOperationStarted(){
fireOperation(new Fireable(){

    @Override
    public void fire(OperationListener listener, OperationEvent event) {            
        listener.operationStarted(event);
    }

});
}

 protected final void fireOperationEnded(){
fireOperation(new Fireable(){

    @Override
    public void fire(OperationListener listener, OperationEvent event) {            
        listener.operationEnded(event);
    }

});
}

protected void fireOperation(Fireable fireable){

    OperationEvent event = new OperationEvent(this);

    for (OperationListener listener : listeners) {
    fireable.fire(listener, event);
    }
}

I'd like to get your opinions, I personally think its better than the first implementation even there is still a lot of boilerplate code. Maybe there is a better way to do this ? I've looked in the java.awt.events package source code to see how they were dealing with multiple events and how they fire them, but it seem way too complicated for my needs.

One thing that i was wondering also is about the lambda expression in Java 8, if i use them without importing any Java 8 packages and i compile, will it work on the JRE7 ?

Could be great to use the JDK8 to make my codes cleaner eventually.

Thanks for your help !

share|improve this question
    
To your question about lambdas: no, implementing them involves changes to the compiler and to the VM as well as to the libraries. You'll need a JRE 8 to execute them. –  Maurice Naftalin Jul 7 '13 at 11:40
    
But - I know you this, but for other people visiting this question - there is in fact now a backport of lambda expressions to Java 5 — 7: blog.orfjackal.net/2013/07/… –  Maurice Naftalin Jul 25 '13 at 23:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think your first example is better. listeners has got to be an instance field, and so readily available to everybody.

(You might have only one method in OperationListener and use a value in OperationEvent to determine which action is involved. Then your methods could all pass the proper event to one method that calls the one listener method.)

Your second idea is interesting, but for use inside one instance of one class, I think it's overkill.

There's all different kinds of ways to store listeners. If you're not adding and removing them too fast, ArrayList is good. If there's any chance of adding and removing them on different threads and you're calling the listeners frequently, CopyOnWriteArrayList is much better.

Don't worry too much about "boilerplate". Java tends to go with wordy-but-simple as regards low level code. The two for loops in your first example call out to be combined somehow, but it's not worth worrying about until you've got a lot more of them.

Lambdas will reduce your lines of code (if you use simple ones; my C# lambdas all end up running 20 lines or more; might as well be anonymous classes!), but they'll add plenty of pages to the language manual. However, lambdas aren't there till JRE 8.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.