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Every time and in every language, when I overwrite a class function and process instruction before calling it "super" function I feel like something is wrong.
But I don't know what ! It's just a bad feeling.
Do you guys think it's a bad practice? Is it confusing for people reading my code?


To make my question clear let's take an exemple.
Consider the class "SendEmail" who simply send email to users.

public class UserEmailSender {

   public String sendTo;
   public Boolean isDeveloper; 

   public void send(String emailBody){
      System.out.println("let's send an email to"+sendTo);
   }
}

Now I want to overwrite this class in order to be sure all the email are send within my company.

public class InCompanyEmailSender extends UserEmailSender{

    @Override
    public void send(String emailBody){
        if(! sendTo.endsWith("@myCompany.com")){
            sendTo = "me@myCompany.com";
        }
        super.send(emailBody);
    }

}


In the class InCompanyEmailSender I'm checking/replacing the email address before calling the "super" send function.
And as it's just an exemple I might do much more...

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It depends on the function. –  It'sNotALie. Jul 5 '13 at 6:52
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This depends on what your goal is. If you are validating input, or need to massage data before passing it on to the super class, you aren't doing anything wrong.

Just make sure you understand what the super class is doing in the function you are overriding, and call or don't call it as appropriate.

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There is nothing wrong with it as long as the design makes sense. In fact, it's common practice to invoke a default behavior after a specialized operations have been applied. Makes perfect sense and goes well with OO principles.

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You can call the super at the place you require, it depends on the operation you are going to perform.

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There is nothing wrong with processing before calling super. Depending on your subclass, you might want to handle some cases yourself, or preprocess some data:

Consider:

public class Widget {
  //...
}

public class Foo {
  public void handleWidget(Widget aWidget) {
    if (aWidget.isCompressed() {
      fail()
    }
    // ...
  }
}
public class Bar extends Foo {
  public void handleWidget(Widget aWidget) {
    if (aWidget.isCompressed()) {
      Compression.decompress(aWidget);´
    }
    super.handleWidget(aWidget);
  }
}
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I believe the rule/recommedations stands valid for constructors but not for other methods. The parent class' constructor needs to be called before the subclass' constructor. This will ensure that if you call any methods on the parent class in your constructor, the parent class has already been set up correctly.

But for other methods, parent class should already be setup well to call the methods. Maybe not in all the scenarios, so answer is depending on scenario you can call super.methods. And i dont see any harm in it.

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