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boolean allValid = true;
for (FormEditText field: allFields) {
    allValid = field.testValidity() && allValid;
}

I suppose allValid is true only if every field.testValidity is true, but how is this kind of statement called or how does it work?

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2  
Yuck. Where did you see this? –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 5 '13 at 8:40
    
After the loop you know if allFields have testValidity() true. I don't know if there is a name for such a code pattern. –  René Link Jul 5 '13 at 8:40
3  
What do you mean by "how is this kind of statement called"? Are you asking for a name? Are you asking when it'll be executed? –  user2357112 Jul 5 '13 at 8:41
    
Would be better with an if false statement that sets allValid and uses break. –  Martin Larsson Jul 5 '13 at 8:45
    
certainly this code works. But can be avoided for best practice. –  Reddy Jul 5 '13 at 8:56

8 Answers 8

It's a rather cryptic and wasteful way of setting a variable to true if, and only if, all the results of field.testValidity() are true.

I prefer something like the following as it's more efficient; unless testValidity() needs to be called on every item in the collection for some reason (in which case the function really ought to be renamed):

boolean allValid = true;
for (FormEditText field: allFields) {
    if (!field.testValidity()){
        allValid = false;
        break;
    }
}
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2  
This looks much better. However, this forces me to brag about how nice we have it in Python: all(field.testValidity() for field in allFields) :) –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 5 '13 at 8:47
3  
Note this is a completly different semantic. What if testValid() changes some state? –  Ingo Jul 5 '13 at 8:59
    
I believe this is quite well written using the booelan logic. For those who are not used to using boolena logic, it may appear cryptic. –  Drona Jul 5 '13 at 9:12
    
@johnchen902; absolutely. I mention that in my answer. –  Bathsheba Jul 5 '13 at 12:39
    
@Bathsheba I see. Sorry for only scanning for the phrase "side effect" without reading the entire sentence. –  johnchen902 Jul 5 '13 at 12:41

Your assumption is correct. If either expression on the right evaluates to false, the AND (&&) evaluates to false, and that result is used in the next iteration. Hence any false will result in a false result.

You might argue you can break out of the loop as soon as you encounter a false (provided testValidity() has no side effects), but that may actually cloud the functioning of this at the expense of some (perhaps negligible) performance increase. I would prefer clarity over efficiency in most cases

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1  
Is this a common idiom in Java? It looks incredibly wasteful. –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 5 '13 at 8:42
1  
I don't think it is. I'm not sure it's wasteful since you'd have to iterate through a collection to determine any false element. Perhaps I would comment it , but I wouldn't be unduly concerned upon encountering it. You might argue you can break out of the loop as soon as you encounter a false, but that may actually cloud the functioning of this at the expense of some (perhaps negligible) performance increase. I would prefer clarity over efficiency in most cases –  Brian Agnew Jul 5 '13 at 8:43
1  
Well, no. You could abort the for loop as soon as you've reached the first False element. That is, unless you're relying on some side effects of .testValidity(), in which case this would be even worse... –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 5 '13 at 8:44
    
I've seen such snippets in some projects. Especially for validation it can be used. –  GokcenG Jul 5 '13 at 8:44
    
@TimPietzcker - noted and I've amended my comment (and answer) appropriately –  Brian Agnew Jul 5 '13 at 8:45

it will turn to false if for any field.testValidity is false because false AND x = false

so it has to be true for all of them + initial value (which is true in this code) to be true after the loop

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In the loop, allValid will remain true as long as field.testValidity() returns true. As soon as field.testValidity() returns false, allValid will become false and stay false.

This is because false && true = false.

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From the code, it looks like this code is used to check if all the fields present in the allFields variable pass the validation.

In this case, we can modify the code such that if one of the field is not valid then we can break the loop.

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No you can't, unless you know that testValidity() is a pure function which doesn't alter state. But since the condition is written testValid() && allValid it rather looks that testValid() must run for all array elements for some reason. –  Ingo Jul 5 '13 at 8:58

for (FormEditText field: allFields) means foreach field in allFields check field.testValidity() AND allValid. So if in any check field.testValidity() returns false then allValid will be false.

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allValid will only be true if all fields are valid.

&& behavior is such that if one of the argument is false, the answer will be false.

If you have 3 fields, then what is happening is:

allValid = field3Valid && (field2Valid && field1Valid);

So if any of the fields turn out to be invalid then allValid will be false.

If field 2 is invalid then:

allValid = true && (false && true);  // ---> true && (false) ----> false

This is how it works and is inefficient as answer of @Bathsheba points out.

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As the name of the field suggests, allValid will be true if and only if all the form fields are valid else it will be false when it exits the loop. It will be false if atleast one of the form field is not valid.

I think this is intelligently written code and would appear cryptic to those who are not well used to boolean arithmatic. This is how I, too, would write it if I had to but with some comments explaining the intent.

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