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I am running a command which was installed as a script of a python package i created.

I have a cronned_job_shell_script.sh file:

touch a.txt
my_script_command

where my_scrip_command was installed using pip install my_py_package.tar.gz

The cron line is:

0 * * * * cronned_job_shell_script.sh

If I run cronned_job_shell_script.sh from shell it works fine, running the python script also.

Even trying env -i /bin/bash --noprofile --norc first and then running the script works.

The problem is, when scheduled by cron, the file a.txt is touched but the script does not seem to run.

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Have you tried 0 * * * * /bin/sh cronned_job_shell_script.sh? –  fedorqui Jul 5 '13 at 9:03
    
Where is my_script_command? Is it possible that it's on the PATH for your login sessions, but not on your default PATH (or root's default path, if this is a root cron rather than a user cron)? –  abarnert Jul 5 '13 at 9:05
    
Meanwhile, would it be acceptable to just put the absolute path /opt/mystuff/bin/my_script_command or whatever instead of relying on PATH? –  abarnert Jul 5 '13 at 9:06
    
@fedorqui tried it now, still does not work –  eran Jul 5 '13 at 9:06
    
@abarnert Solved it, the problem was that cron ran it as a root user. Write it down as an answer and I'll accept it so you get the points :) –  eran Jul 5 '13 at 9:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that you're putting this in the system crontab, which means it's being run by root, and root has a different PATH variable than your user. So, testing it in the shell (as you, not root) doesn't actually test the same thing.

The easiest solution is to just use the absolute path to the script—/opt/mystuff/bin/my_script_command instead of just my_script_command.

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